Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

The one and only free public forum for Bohras. The focus of this forum is the reform movement, the Dawoodi Bohra faith and, of course, the corrupt priesthood. But the discussion is in no way restricted to the Bohras alone.
bohrabhai
Posts: 401
Joined: Thu Jan 09, 2014 11:16 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#31

Unread post by bohrabhai » Fri Jul 25, 2014 11:00 pm

IMG-20140726-WA0001.jpg
Times of india front page .Y

bohrabhai
Posts: 401
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Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#32

Unread post by bohrabhai » Fri Jul 25, 2014 11:04 pm

file-4.jpeg
instead of encouraging education kothar is promoting roti making in young girls

seeker110
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Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#33

Unread post by seeker110 » Sat Jul 26, 2014 1:18 am

All little girls in my childhood days played with waylan/patla. It was their play-dough. My sister made Alaskan maps with her play roti.

DisillusionedDB
Posts: 379
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2014 7:20 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#34

Unread post by DisillusionedDB » Sat Jul 26, 2014 3:25 am

seeker110 wrote:All little girls in my childhood days played with waylan/patla. It was their play-dough. My sister made Alaskan maps with her play roti.
Roti making in a playful childhood is far different than what is being propagated now.

fustrate_Bohra
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Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#35

Unread post by fustrate_Bohra » Sat Jul 26, 2014 3:39 am

My daughter who is few years old play with roti and belan while her mother makes rotis in kitchen(only for family) and i found it to be cute but after this propagation of roti mania by ms i dont find her this act as cute as used to be earlier.

WiththenameofAllah
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Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#36

Unread post by WiththenameofAllah » Sat Jul 26, 2014 5:46 am

It is like degrading women ! One must read Mufti Menk's lecture on Companions of Prophet Peace Be Upon Him. One will realize the strength of a Muslim Woman.

bohrabhai
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Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#37

Unread post by bohrabhai » Fri Aug 15, 2014 1:01 am

Today at lal quila narender modi had made remarkable speech about women empowerment .he talked about parents behaviour toward their sons on rape topic .
Please someone show to muffadal saifuddin this speech.and tell him rather than su thai su thai he should say some logical things.

Truth-Prevails
Posts: 146
Joined: Sat Feb 08, 2014 1:02 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#38

Unread post by Truth-Prevails » Sat Aug 23, 2014 1:31 am

Mint Center page article:

http://www.livemint.com/Leisure/5jOHGgI ... -work.html

Society: Why we work
We meet four successful Dawoodi Bohra women, whose new religious head would rather they learn home science instead of pursuing careers and callings

Ever since 68-year-old Mufaddal Saifuddin took over as the 53rd Dai or spiritual leader of the Dawoodi Bohras in January, his sermons have attracted curiosity from members of the million-strong sub-sect of Ismaili Shia Muslims, a large section of whom live in Mumbai. His statements on women’s roles in particular have caused much debate.

In his sermons, the syedna has mentioned that women ought not to work in call centres as that may lead them to “commit sins”. He has also reportedly stated that women ought to learn how to cook and stitch, and desist from attending institutions of higher education. Some households disallow women from being seen in public without the rida, a two-piece hijab; others prevent women from being photographed.

The public role played by women has been historically undervalued in the community, writes Rehana Ghadially, a professor who retired from the department of humanities and social sciences at the Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai. In an article titled The Campaign For Women’s Emancipation In An Ismaili Shia (Daudi Bohra) Sect Of Indian Muslims: 1929-1945, she writes: “Unlike the fierce and prolonged debate aroused by the campaign to give up purdah, higher education for girls did not arouse similar passion.”

“The campaign by stressing the ideas of male/female complimentarily rather than equality left unchallenged women’s dependence on men in social, legal and economic matters. It never sought to redefine women’s sphere but only sought to extend it,” says the article, published in a 2002 book, Muslim Feminism And Feminist Movement: South Asia (Volume 1), edited by Abida Samiuddin and Rashida Khanam.

However, there are many in the community who do not subscribe to orthodox strictures on what women ought to do, education, work and domestic chores included. Zehra Cyclewala, a Dawoodi Bohra reformist who took on the earlier syedna’s 1985 dictum to give up working at the Saif Cooperative Society bank in Surat, refusing to give up her job as a manager, is one of them. Ex-communicated as a result, Cyclewala has fought a 29-year-long battle, often taking the help of courts and the police, against orthodox sections of her community. “These rules are meant to keep women oppressed. If the woman was educated, she would raise her voice and that’s what they don’t want,” says Cyclewala of the syedna’s reported remarks about women’s education.

We profile four successful professionals and their working relationship with their community.

Nushrat Bharucha, 26
Actor
Petite and diminutive Nushrat Bharucha insists that we send her the questions we intend to ask her before meeting the following day. “In this industry, half the things said are frivolous and for entertainment. But I don’t want that to happen for an issue that defines who you are,” she offers by way of explanation.
Bharucha, the critically acclaimed actor of films such as Love Sex Aur Dhokha and Pyaar Ka Punchnama, has good reason to be circumspect. Her choice of profession hasn’t gone down too well with the more orthodox members of her extended family.
Bharucha entered the profession at the age of 16. As a student of Jai Hind college a decade ago, she walked into a talent management firm hoping to volunteer as a scout. Instead, they hired her to act in a serial, Kitty Party, on Zee TV. The long work hours and shoddy treatment of newbies led Bharucha to quit the show in a year.
At the time, when her mother would accompany her to the studio, Bharucha would tell members of her extended family that acting was only a summer job. “In our community, we are encouraged to take up professions like medicine or engineering that offer consistency and job security. Acting is not a ‘real’ profession,” she says, sitting near the window of her Juhu, Mumbai, home, where she lives with her parents and paternal grandmother. “Some of them still look at me with a question in their eyes, ‘What have you done in the past 10 years?’”
Yet, after college, Bharucha found herself drawn to the studio—this time for a film offer. “It was then that I realized what acting meant. Film was nothing like television; there was a craft to it, and I realized how much hard work was needed. It was not some mindless two-bit job that only requires you to look good.”
Bharucha’s parents, Tasneem, a homemaker, and Tanvir, a businessman, were initially apprehensive but supported their only child’s decision. “I was slightly sceptical at first,” says Tasneem, adding that she had encouraged her daughter to take up theatre in school. The main concern, she says, was whether Nushrat would find a good Bohra match. Bharucha believes she will find the right man, who shares her world view, within the community. “Are there any?” we ask her father, who replies, “Of course there are.”
“We are very close as a family. There are uncles and aunts for whom I would stand in front of a truck,” says Bharucha, echoing a sentiment common in the Dawoodi Bohra community, known for its close network of familial, social and economic ties. “One can’t live in solitude. To survive as a single family unit is not possible. So my parents would still go to the mosque and happily do everything that is asked of them. Whom we are connected to matters more to us,” says Bharucha.
While her parents don’t pressure her to go to the mosque to pray or keep a fast during Ramzan (she can’t because of health concerns), Bharucha says she acquiesces to the more orthodox elements of her family when needed. “If I’m asked to wear a rida and attend a ceremony, I’d do it. I don’t get into a debate.”
At the same time, however, Bharucha espouses the need for a more liberal attitude towards religion. “A religion can’t define a person. It tells you what you should and shouldn’t do, but the choice is always up to you. The sanctity of faith gets lost if one is forced to do things. Let me listen to sermons and decide for myself what moves me, what I feel like thanking God for and asking of Him.”
In many ways, Bharucha’s attitude is a product of her parents’ choices. While Tasneem grew up in the predominantly Bohra neighbourhood of Bhendi Bazar, she moved to Juhu after marrying Tanvir, whose business of heat-resistant ceramic coating counts auto giants as clients. Moving away from the neighbourhood spelt small freedoms—to not wear a rida, for instance, each time she stepped out of home, to not visit the mosque out of compulsion, among others. Tanvir also didn’t depend on other Dawoodi Bohras for business, unlike the scores of hardware stores or clothes merchants’ shops that populate the locality. This, too, Bharucha’s parents count as a blessing.
“I’ve been brought up with both elements in family—orthodox and liberal. I would never tell my cousins who follow all that is preached that they’re wrong. I think being an actor helps me understand where they’re coming from.”

Ummul Ranalvi, 54
Corporate training firm owner
Tasneema Ranalvi, 51
Publisher
The view from Ummul Ranalvi’s drawing room is captivating—from the ninth floor of a tony apartment complex in Bandra, Mumbai, one can see the Arabian Sea and, beyond it, the high-rises along the Worli Sea Face and Parel’s behemoth glass facades. “We are Bandra girls,” laughs Tasneema Ranalvi, the younger sibling, who lives nearby. Masooma Ranalvi, a 47-year-old social activist based in New Delhi, who practised criminal law in Mumbai in the 1980s, is the youngest.
Tasneema runs Source Publishers, an offshoot of Super Book House (SBH), a firm for books on subjects like design, architecture and gemmology, among other things, started by their father, Shoaib Ranalvi, in the 1970s, when the family lived in the Dawoodi Bohra neighbourhood of Nagpada.
She joined SBH after completing a master’s in technology in 1988. Ummul completed her master’s in psychology and opened a training firm, Continuing Education and Training Centre (CETC), in 1986 to acquaint companies with the subjects that her father sold books on. She, however, branched out to offer soft-skills training—one of her first clients was Mahanagar Telephone Nigam Ltd, the government’s telecommunications arm. Her firm now provides audio-visual training such as videos on sexual harassment in the workplace, content development, and assessment tools for employees, among other things.
“That’s him,” says Ummul, pointing to a black and white close-up photograph in a thin steel frame. Shoaib Ranalvi, who died in 2010 was excommunicated in 1979 for taking part in the movement which fought for reforms within the community. Led by the late Asghar Ali Engineer and late Noman Contractor, among others, the movement sought greater transparency in financial dealings by the Dai and protested the coercion to perform rites and pay annual tax.
It was the excommunication that forced the family to move to Bandra in the early 1980s. “We never felt the effects of the ostracism, because the three of us were happy to just be with each other. It was our mother who felt it most,” says Ummul. Their mother Aziza, now 82, lives with Tasneema and her husband Hemant, a nuclear physicist by training. Their daughter lives in the UK.
“Our mother loved attending prayer meetings, and was very good at recitation. However, during one majlis, she was asked by the host to not return. But she remained close to her family and maintained some ties,” says Ummul.
The sisters cannot pray in a Bohra mosque and when their father died, he was buried in a Muslim cemetery, not a Bohra one. However, the sisters, who had a fairly conservative upbringing till adolescence, don’t feel troubled by it. “Our father supported us in everything we wanted to do. He encouraged us to study and work, start our own firms. Usually in the community, girls marry early, but he didn’t pressure us into doing that,” says Ummul, crediting her success to her father’s progressiveness.
The sisters are also vocal opponents of the practice of female genital mutilation, the practice of cutting off a girl’s clitoris while still a child, followed by certain members of the community. “I don’t understand why more people don’t oppose such rites. What will people lose?” asks Tasneema.
One of the biggest challenges facing her at the moment is the Internet. Her publishing firm, which comes out with two bi-monthly magazines, The Design Source and New Age Salon & Spa, cannot sustain in the digital age, where information is now available for free, and at the click of a mouse. Together with Masooma, she is contemplating shutting down the magazines (both have a print run of 20,000 copies) and going digital instead.
“Our father learnt to operate the computer when he was in his 70s,” she says. “He would compile interesting thoughts and stories into a small booklet called Chotein Chotein Baatein, which we would deliver to companies as handouts for employees,” says Tasneema.
The booklet encapsulates the sort of humour and idealistic values that kept the Ranalvi family sane in the midst of much upheaval. “We will continue to print that booklet,” adds Tasneema.

Insia Lacewalla, 27
Co-founder of a food consultancy firm
If there is one thing Insia Lacewalla has in common with her community, it is her nose for scenting a business opportunity. Rewind to a few years ago when major metropolitan cities in India were in the throes of a love affair with food—the online food market had surged to `1,000 crore the in 2012 and gourmet ingredients, plating sessions, food carving classes and MasterChef shows had everyone in thrall.
For Lacewalla, three years into food consulting for music events and restaurants and creating hospitality riders for international musicians on their India tours (including Lady Gaga), it was time to take things to the next level for home chefs without the platform to display their wares.
In June 2013, she held the first food pop-up on the rooftop of a popular Bandra store. It was called The Bakers’ Sale. “It rained all day and my phone was ringing off the hook with people wondering whether we should postpone the do. But everything had already been arranged, 13 home chefs were on board, it was too late to turn back.” The pop-up was supposed to last from 4-9pm, but by 7.30, they were sold out.
This has been a feature of Lacewalla’s pop-ups ever since—numbers that don’t let her down, and a clientele from all parts of the city.
While Lacewalla continues to work as a food consultant for food bazaars and music events, she has begun to take her food pop-up work to the point of origin: people’s homes. With friend and researcher Sneha Nair, she has held five iterations of Poppaddum, where Nair would cook a sadhya, or a traditional Keralite meal, and invite strangers (“food lovers”) to sample it. Next month, she will roll out yet another initiative for home-based chefs called Secret Ingredient. The only requirement is that members will have to cook traditional meals that are not easily available in restaurants.
“Food is a very important part of the Bohras’ community experience. We remember people’s weddings by how good the dal gosht was,” laughs Lacewalla, whose parents live in Pune. Lacewalla started her company without informing them and didn’t tell them she had quit her job. “I wanted to start my own thing, but I didn’t want them to feel that I didn’t know what I was doing,” she says. Yet, she credits her folks’ willingness to let her live alone in Mumbai for everything she has subsequently achieved.
It wasn’t easy at first, admits Lacewalla. “I’ve been meeting boys since I was 18,” she says, referring to her parents’ efforts to fix her up with a “good Bohra boy” in an arranged marriage. She was in college, but her folks weren’t averse to her dropping out. Lacewalla met the boys, but refused to quit college. “It wasn’t dramatic, like in the movies. But I pushed back slowly. I told them that I wanted to complete my education.”
In 2008, Lacewalla enrolled for a master’s diploma in public relations and corporate communication at the Xavier Institute of Communications, Mumbai. Her maternal grandmother lived alone in Bhendi Bazaar and was happy that a grandchild would live with her. “It was an emotional matter and my parents agreed to the move easily.” Three years later, her younger sister Zahabia, 26, moved to the city. She now works in the television industry as a stylist.
Moving away from her parents’ home helped Lacewalla tackle the matter of meeting potential grooms; it also offered her a level playing field to explore her career options. She started off marketing the Aamir Khan-starrer 3 Idiots. She found her niche in food after working for the NH7 Weekender music festival organized by Mumbai-based production firm Only Much Louder.
“Now they’re no longer pressuring me to marry a Bohra boy, but will be happy as long as I get married,” she laughs. “They’re proud of the work I do. I’m looking to tap into this underground food culture of home chefs, for whom cooking is a genuine passion,” she says.
Her parents, she knows, will understand.

SBM
Posts: 6231
Joined: Sun May 09, 2004 4:01 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#39

Unread post by SBM » Sat Aug 23, 2014 2:07 pm

HasmiNoor wrote:^ Mufaddal Bs is certainly correct in some way but yes he is bit straight forward and lacks diplomacy, he will learn that in coming years.
Which way? Can you list 5 qualities of leadership he posses other than Mafia style collecting money from the community.

SBM
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Joined: Sun May 09, 2004 4:01 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#40

Unread post by SBM » Sat Aug 23, 2014 10:51 pm

I think MS is correct about woman stand, specially looking at today's world conditions.
So it is okay for Bohra women to come out in public for deedar of Moula and getting pushed and shoved around?
How come SMS has not issued any FARMAN for Amtes not to come out on street for his Deedar and stay home?
You need to get your priorities straight. It is okay for Amtes to stand on street with folded hands for his deedar but it is not okay for them to get an honest and respectable living.

qutub_mamajiwala
Posts: 1006
Joined: Tue Jul 23, 2013 4:17 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#41

Unread post by qutub_mamajiwala » Sun Aug 24, 2014 1:54 am

community should be proud of nushrat and other ladies

qutub_mamajiwala
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Joined: Tue Jul 23, 2013 4:17 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#42

Unread post by qutub_mamajiwala » Sun Aug 24, 2014 7:33 am

yes dear
community and islam has nothing to lose if behaya people leave
and behaya people are aamils and kothar who do rape and conceal it.
do all types of domestic violence in the name of religion.
gud if they leave
agree?

bohrabhai
Posts: 401
Joined: Thu Jan 09, 2014 11:16 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#43

Unread post by bohrabhai » Thu Aug 28, 2014 10:05 am

Idea note_20140816_193703_01(1).jpg
See muffdal saiffudin propagating non sense things.indstead of encouraging education .

ghulam muhammed
Posts: 11653
Joined: Tue Oct 07, 2008 5:34 pm

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#44

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Thu Aug 28, 2014 2:13 pm

'SLEEVEWALI" RIDA INTRODUCED BY MUFFY FOR HAJI WOMEN. IT COMES WITH A PRICE TAG OF 150 DOLLARS (RS.7,600/-). ANOTHER MONEY MAKING IDEA !!

Image

Image

fustrate_Bohra
Posts: 678
Joined: Mon Nov 25, 2013 6:46 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#45

Unread post by fustrate_Bohra » Sat Aug 30, 2014 3:01 am

bohrabhai wrote:
Idea note_20140816_193703_01(1).jpg
See muffdal saiffudin propagating non sense things.indstead of encouraging education .

Hahaha, if we are in this caste we HAVE to follow whatever he introduces unless you have money to buy him.

1. We have to give less importance to education
2. We have to encourage our ladies to make roti and topi guthing
3. We have to shell out our money in each and every non sensical, silly things
4. We have to accept all the fairy tales related to our earlier 2 zameen na khuda and our current khuda MS.
5. We have to accept that our DAIs are gatekeeper of heaven
6. We have to keep our self respect aside while speaking with any members from jamaat, kothar, qasreali and dai
7. We have to ignore their lifestyles and ayashi
8. We have to take raza on each and every thing whether its naming ceremony, nikaah or funeral or x,y,z even if tomorrow he says raza for potti is mandatory, we have to be prepared for that as well.

If we are in this caste and are not rich than we HAVE to follow the above things, this also means that there is no difference between us and abde the only difference is they do it willingly and we do it forcefully.


SBM
Posts: 6231
Joined: Sun May 09, 2004 4:01 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#47

Unread post by SBM » Sat Aug 30, 2014 8:42 am

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zu4xpDuf84A
I am Amte, hear me Cry
Because I heard it all before
and I am back down on the floor
SMS is going to keep me down there because
I am amte, hear me cry
But it is stupidity I still have
Yes- I will pay the price for
the Khushi of SMS as Dai
I am Amte--hear me Cry.
I am Amte, I can do anything for the Dai
See how much I gained for the Khushi of the Dai
I can make ROTI, I can do RIDA and oh yes I can do DEEDAR
Because I am Amte, I am weak and I can Cry..

haqniwaat
Posts: 516
Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2014 6:06 pm

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#48

Unread post by haqniwaat » Sat Aug 30, 2014 6:05 pm

SBM wrote:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zu4xpDuf84A
I am Amte, hear me Cry
Because I heard it all before
and I am back down on the floor
SMS is going to keep me down there because
I am amte, hear me cry
But it is stupidity I still have
Yes- I will pay the price for
the Khushi of SMS as Dai
I am Amte--hear me Cry.
I am Amte, I can do anything for the Dai
See how much I gained for the Khushi of the Dai
I can make ROTI, I can do RIDA and oh yes I can do DEEDAR
Because I am Amte, I am weak and I can Cry..
You are keeping him in his raj by continuing to follow him. Your choice. Can't blame anyone but yourself! Look at the women who follow Syedna Qutbuddin. They live examples of Fatema and Khadija and Hurratul Maleka, not Johra.

fiate2000
Posts: 79
Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2014 7:35 pm

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#49

Unread post by fiate2000 » Sun Aug 31, 2014 5:09 am

Is not the libaas for haaj meant to be white?

ghulam muhammed wrote:'SLEEVEWALI" RIDA INTRODUCED BY MUFFY FOR HAJI WOMEN. IT COMES WITH A PRICE TAG OF 150 DOLLARS (RS.7,600/-). ANOTHER MONEY MAKING IDEA !!

Image

Image

DisillusionedDB
Posts: 379
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2014 7:20 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#50

Unread post by DisillusionedDB » Sun Aug 31, 2014 5:24 am

Soon we will have the general populace also sporting "sleevewali ridas". The next new rage.
Actually, it would be a welcome change particularly to those women who travel in buses and trains and have to raise their arms to hold on to the overhead supports.

WiththenameofAllah
Posts: 230
Joined: Sat May 24, 2014 9:13 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#51

Unread post by WiththenameofAllah » Sat Sep 27, 2014 2:14 am

Life of a bohra girl is already doomed. Since birth she is a victim of FMG , some cruelty done to her when she is innocent enough to not even understand this. Education is not her right she is kept busy in masjid or outside masjid only flaunting in her beautiful ridas. If she even dares to think she is excommunicated. She cannot say a word against mola. Our community is a prison , a prison where you cannot think, thinking is not for dawoodi bohras. If she gets engaged she is made to do haram things and there is no body to stop that. And the leader is sleeping ! I wonder he is ghaib na jankar why he does not see these ills that are happening in the community?
Isn't it ironical that most of the individuals on this forum are men ? women as she stays home and spend more time with the children is responsible for enriching the children with the islamic disciplines and virtues.But sadly dawoodi bohra religion is only limited to the dai and dai made disciplines .

shabbir4u
Posts: 171
Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2010 12:46 pm

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#52

Unread post by shabbir4u » Sat Sep 27, 2014 10:46 am

WiththenameofAllah wrote:Life of a bohra girl is already doomed. Since birth she is a victim of FMG , some cruelty done to her when she is innocent enough to not even understand this. Education is not her right she is kept busy in masjid or outside masjid only flaunting in her beautiful ridas. If she even dares to think she is excommunicated. She cannot say a word against mola. Our community is a prison , a prison where you cannot think, thinking is not for dawoodi bohras. If she gets engaged she is made to do haram things and there is no body to stop that. And the leader is sleeping ! I wonder he is ghaib na jankar why he does not see these ills that are happening in the community?
Isn't it ironical that most of the individuals on this forum are men ? women as she stays home and spend more time with the children is responsible for enriching the children with the islamic disciplines and virtues.But sadly dawoodi bohra religion is only limited to the dai and dai made disciplines .
If she gets engaged she is made to do haram things and there is no body to stop that----------------------What made you to say that what you mean by that.

WiththenameofAllah
Posts: 230
Joined: Sat May 24, 2014 9:13 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#53

Unread post by WiththenameofAllah » Sat Sep 27, 2014 11:10 am

Assalamoalaykum,
Brother , islam has a very defined process of marrige where aman and woman meet in presence of a wali and talk not like our community that you meet ten times before engagement , five times after. All mehram dar of a women that are defined inislam does not include fiance . Is there anybody in our community to speakabout that ? Forwarding pictures through whatsapp of girl ? And on oneha f you say hijab !!!! I respect hijab deeply but rida is not only hijab ..

saminaben
Posts: 132
Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2014 7:57 pm

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#54

Unread post by saminaben » Sat Sep 27, 2014 11:38 am

The few hearteningly positive things I see on this forum full of majority of men is the extent to which the men are speaking up and against the injustices and atrocities against women, including the fgm activists, mostly men, who are so proactive. I as a woman, applaud all of you, you know who you are. If I start naming, I am afraid I will miss out on some, there are so many of you.

Didn't someone once say "injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere" .

The white man was instrumental in helping the black man during the American civil war. We all need help from everyone to fight against injustice anywhere.

shabbir4u
Posts: 171
Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2010 12:46 pm

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#55

Unread post by shabbir4u » Sat Sep 27, 2014 12:28 pm

WiththenameofAllah wrote:Assalamoalaykum,
Brother , islam has a very defined process of marrige where aman and woman meet in presence of a wali and talk not like our community that you meet ten times before engagement , five times after. All mehram dar of a women that are defined inislam does not include fiance . Is there anybody in our community to speakabout that ? Forwarding pictures through whatsapp of girl ? And on oneha f you say hijab !!!! I respect hijab deeply but rida is not only hijab ..
Yes Brother you are right at some point but you need to understand a girl have to spend her rest of life with a guy so they need to understand each another. their thought their family likes and dislikes. In western countries Boy n girl they live in partner but our community does not allowed live in partner.

If they don't understand each another before marriage its big problem afterwards.

This is my point of views another most welcome.
Allah bless us and protect us.

WiththenameofAllah
Posts: 230
Joined: Sat May 24, 2014 9:13 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#56

Unread post by WiththenameofAllah » Sun Sep 28, 2014 1:29 am

Brother understanding each other is a different thing - that can be done by talking in presence of a wali. Me , you and everybody is very well aware of what happens in our community after commitment and a good example of that is also the Taruff Programs that are excellent source of spreading behayahie .

SBM
Posts: 6231
Joined: Sun May 09, 2004 4:01 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#57

Unread post by SBM » Mon Sep 29, 2014 11:18 am

Not there yet but the way SMS is going with women status in Dawoodi Bohra, may be die hard abdes will demand the same

http://www.inquisitr.com/1505542/ultra- ... r-request/

Al Zulfiqar
Posts: 4609
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2006 5:01 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#58

Unread post by Al Zulfiqar » Mon Sep 29, 2014 12:27 pm

here is a concise and brief status of amtes in mufatlal raj (as mentioned on another thread on this forum):

rule no. 71.

our aqa ane mola aali qadr aqiqul yemen, yaaqut al hind, rabbul al aalameen, haqiqi kaaba, haq na saheb, mojiza na saheb, jaanat na redhwan, panjatan na vaaris, ali na lakhte jigar etc etc and blah, blah and blah... has decided to formalise and channelise his khauf ane mayusi against amtes who do not wear the prescribed ridha and do not attend every majlis, miqaat ane bayan in violation of his divine farmaans and against the wishes of her abde shohar who demonstrates unlimited valvalo for his mola ane khuda, but his naapak bairo dashes his beliefs and faith by disobeying him.

for such naa farman and naapak amtes who do not show the requisite zalzalo, mufatlal has decided to set down the following laws into stone:

1. the suffering abde shohar will be called in for special sessions of sabak, wherein he will be taught the esoteric art of handling his errant bairo. The correct tone and choice of alfaaz from lisane dawat with which to initially reprimand, then berate, and finally soft non-aggressive methods to be adopted to make this magpie fall in line, such as refusing all communication, denial of marital rights, stoppage of pocket money and enforced cease and desist orders to refrain from all non-essential shopping. Thus only daily groceries, medicines and clothes for family will be allowed, all other personal shopping for this amte will be considered ‘objectif non-grata’.

yes, 'tez nigah' training will also be imparted, not only to the errant amte's shauhar, but to all abde's overall when they attend the secret sabaks. movie clips of famous estwhile bollywood villains, such as k.n. singh, pran, amrish puri, and hollywood monsters such as frankenstein, dracula, the power-saw wielding psycho of 'nightmare on elm street' and others are shown repeatedly to the pliant abdes so that they can pick up tips on how to bring about that fear dripping, soul shaking look into their eyes, the correct body language to match, the facial expressions, the correct ambience to be created (red pulsating lights, deep resonating gong like music etc) before unleashing that 'tez-nigah' on any unsuspecting sinner amte, springing out on her from behind a hidden bush, driving her nuts and ready to commit harakiri.

the HPC of the DEH has recruited several amtes who act as willing stooges on which this whole tez nigah business can be practised. their fearful reactions, body-cringing sobs and copious amount of tears is the final indication on how successful the tez nigah exercise is. the most accomplished of the tez nigah practitioners is then enlisted as a coach who then undertakes to train others in this esoteric art. it is expected that soon a whole army of bohras will be well-versed as tez nigahi's and could collectively strike terror into the tender hearts of amtes who refuse to obey their aqa and mola's divine farmaans and flaunt themselves without ridhas and refuse to make a min. of 100 rotis per day at lightning speeds.

this army of tez nigahi bohras will also serve as the 1st line of defense to their haqiqi kaaba. stationed at strategic positions around his kaafila and divine personage, they will turn their dreaded looks onto unruly abdes, amtes and non-bohras who dare to disturb his holy aura. when concentrated, the tez nigah looks will have the power to dissolve all opposition, a' la piercing lasers or intense water-jets which can cut through steel. there is immense potential for this secret sabaki trained tez nigah warriors. they would constitute a most effective security shield around heads of state, kings, sultans and shaikhs. instead of black suited, burly, dark glasses donned personal body guards, you will soon see white std fluttering abdes in gold kasab fetas and topis directing their fearsome tez nigah's on the vast assemblage, striking terror and deterrence into their hearts. imagine the tremendous new sources of income for mufatlal, he could soon be rolling in the legendary treasures of solomon with his paws up in the air, whilst nubile qatari air-hostesses tickle his dimpled cheeks and belly!

apparently, word of this tez nigah trained abde brigades has already reached the ears of the top secret U.S, presidential guards, the mercenary forces of blackwater corporation and many other killers-for- hire shady outfits. this is all due to the beshumaar barakat ane ehsaan of our allah na dai! su eni niraaaaaali shaaaaan chhe!!
2. If defiance still persists, then a senior jamaat aayan will visit the hapless abde’s home and after careful study of the layout, will pinpoint the exact dark and damp corner of the house which will be designated for the criminal amte to be confined in. physical restraints such as handcuffs, belts, gags, straitjackets etc will be provided to hold this daredevil amte for delineated periods.
3. If the rebellion persists, concerned abde will have access to a number of measures and tools. Each and every jamaat office in every moze’ and vatan will soon be stocked with a variety of recommended canes and whips. The thinnest and shortest stick will be used in the initial stage, followed by sticks of increasing thicknesses and lengths. Abdes can rest assured that all the above devices have been suitably ‘phookofied’ by their great master and lord.
4. Somewhat similar to Shakespeare’s observation (but far more superior in its impact) that the quality of mercy is twice blessed, the quality of punishment in the abde’s case is thrice blessed. It blesses the amte in bringing her to siratul mustaqeem, it blesses the sorrowful abde for he has wisely chosen to implement his god’s command and prove his undying fidagiri, and most importantly, it blesses mufatlal because every stroke of the cane or the whip, as the severity of the case demands, leads to indirect pleasure of the rabbul aalameen. The slicing of the whip into soft flesh is the cause of his smile and his soul brims over with joy.
5. If all above measures fail, the amte harpie - the disgusting gargoyle and medusa - is to be cast into the streets, before ‘su ne su thai jaye’. The exact spot and location of this repulsion is to be chosen in conjunction with your local amil, who will fit this ‘no-longer amte’ with a GPS tracking device, which will be monitored from Saifee mahal by their tech wizards.
6. In selected instances, based on hitherto to-be-decided parameters, it is widely expected (as reported by deep throat) that aqa mola mufatlal will intervene and grant refuge to this abandoned ex-amte after personal counselling and sabaks. If she mends her ways, said amte will be returned with a new latest-fashion ridha to her shohar abde, if not may ‘su ne su thai jaye’ happen with her.

Deep throat advises that this ground-breaking initiative has already been communicated to every amil and zaada, but stocks of canes, whips, belts, gags, etc are awaited by every jamaat office and only then will this azeemushaan nemat, beshumaar barakat ane ehsaan of mufatlal will roll into action.

All amtes beware!

bohrabhai
Posts: 401
Joined: Thu Jan 09, 2014 11:16 am

Re: Women's status in Muffadal Saifuddin raj

#59

Unread post by bohrabhai » Fri Oct 10, 2014 1:36 pm

today is great day for women education cause that noble peace prize given to Malala . in her word

""The wise saying, 'The pen is mightier than sword' was true. The extremists are afraid of books and pens,The power of education frightens them. They are afraid of women. The power of the voice of women frightens them."
http://youtu.be/QRh_30C8l6Y?t=8m59s

VS
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aVO5Ux6lzXc
Su thai Su su thai jai .Birao ne to ghar no khuno sachvano che ena mard na ghare jai ne enu kam karvanu 6.
Last edited by bohrabhai on Fri Oct 10, 2014 1:54 pm, edited 2 times in total.

bohrabhai
Posts: 401
Joined: Thu Jan 09, 2014 11:16 am

Malala vs ??

#60

Unread post by bohrabhai » Fri Oct 10, 2014 1:43 pm

today is great day for women education cause that noble peace prize given to Malala . in her word

""The wise saying, 'The pen is mightier than sword' was true. The extremists are afraid of books and pens,The power of education frightens them. They are afraid of women. The power of the voice of women frightens them."
http://youtu.be/QRh_30C8l6Y?t=8m59s


VS
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aVO5Ux6lzXc
Su thai Su su thai jai .Birao ne to ghar no khuno sachvano che ena mard na ghare jai ne enu kam karvanu 6.