Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased view

Given modern distractions, the need to understand Islam better has never been more urgent. Through this forum we can share ideas and hopefully promote the true spirit of Islam which calls for peace, justice, tolerance, inclusiveness and diversity.
shehzaada
Posts: 163
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2014 3:04 pm

Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased view

#1

Unread post by shehzaada » Sun Apr 27, 2014 3:13 pm

Introduction

Copying holy Koran and making caps for livelihood! Wealthiest emperor with annual tribute in hundreds of millions pounds. Greatest emperor in terms of territory from Kandahar (Afghhanistan) to South India. What is the paradox? Abdul Muzaffar Muhuddin Mohammad Aurangzeb was great not only in terms of wealth and territory. He was rich in thought and character. Mahatma Gandhi came with theory of trusteeship for capitalists in twentieth century. But Aurangzeb believed in trusteeship of emperor, who had no right to use the money collected from his subjects for his personal purpose. Contrast this not only with his predecessors but also with present day politicians and bureaucrats. He was the last great Mughal emperor who lived as a fakir.

Early childhood

Aurangzeb was born on fourth November 1618 at Dahod Gujarat. He was the third son and sixth child of Prince Khurram who later became emperor and was better known as Shah Jahan. His father was governor of Gujarat. On unsuccessful rebellion by his father, he and his brother Dara shikoh were kept by their grandparents Jehangir and Noorjehan as hostages in Lahore court. When Shahjehan became emperor, Aurangzeb returned to Agra to live with his parents. Aurangzeb was very sharp in studies. He studied Arabic and Persian languages. He mastered Islamic religious scripture that he could cite with ease. He was an expert in drafting letters and comments on petitions. Obviously, these skills added to his administrative capability. He had also a very beautiful handwriting. Some of his manuscripts are located in Mecca and Medina. A copy of his manuscript is also preserved in Nizamuddin Auliya Dargah.



He was not only intelligent and studious. He was very brave and fearless. Just at age of fifteen years, he bravely faced a war elephant who had run amok and stampeded imperial encampment. Aurangzeb risked his life and faced the elephant. He killed the elephant with a lance (a kind of spear). He was given title of 'Bahadur' after this brave act.



His career as prince and emperor

Aurangzeb was a very ambitious, hardworking, clever, religious person. He received monthly allowance Rs. 500/- per day as prince. This amount was very valuable in those days. Aurangzeb spent the allowance on religious education and study of history. He did not like that his brothers were more interested in womanizing and drinks. Although Aurangzeb was a Muslim, it will not be wrong to say that he was a Raja Yogi in the meaning of Hindu tradition. It will not be out of place to mention that once he gave up his assignment as Viceroy of Deccan and left for wild region in western Ghats to live as a Faqir(yogi in Hindu terminology). This clearly shows that he was not an individualist. He worked for people and not himself.

During his long career, he held several assignments. He worked as Viceroy of Deccan. He also worked in remote areas like Afghanistan. Although Dara Shikoh was his favorite, Shah Jahan, the emperor, recognized the ability of Aurangzeb. He gave him command of army in 1634. Aurangzeb had the honor to use red tent- a symbol of prestige. He was appointed viceroy of Deccan in 1636. Aurangzed got notable success in Ahmedabad.

Shah Jehan had deep affection for his daughter Jahan Ara. Once she got burnt. Aurangzeb delayed in reporting this event to shah Jahan for considerable period. The emperor was annoyed and he stripped Aurangzeb of all honors. He sent Aurangzeb to far away region- Afghanistan. There were logistics problems. Murad Baksh, his predecessor had been ineffective. Aurangzeb was undoubtedly very capable but in view of several problems and stiff resistance from the Uzbeks, Mughal army suffered heavy loss. Somehow the Mughal forces saved face by getting nominal acceptance of authority as emperor at a heavy price.

As viceroy and later emperor, Aurangzeb expanded his territory far and wide- Afghanistan,Ladakh, Gujarat, South including Bijapur and Golconda. However, he was not an individualist. Expansion of empire was for glory of Mughal rule and not his personal gain. He himself lived very simple. Contrast this with his predecessors. His predecessors built buildings and gardens for personal satisfaction. Shah Jahan even got built a memorable building for his beloved wife at cost of state. Jehangir was a womanizer and drunkard. Akbar had no faith in any religion. He even toyed with so called Din e elahi that he himself founded.

Aurangzeb became an emperor by clever use of his tactics and bravery. When shah Jahan fell ill, there was wide spread rumor that his days were numbered. Then there was armed conflict between brothers. Aurangzeb succeeded in turning events to his favor. Dara Shikoh was main contender but he was no match to Aurangzeb in military strategy. Murad, one of his brothers was executed for murder of Diwan of Gujarat. In fact, Aurangzeb motivated the relatives of the Diwan to seek justice under shariat law. Dara shikoh was arrested and humiliated. He was brought in chains to Delhi and executed on 30th August 1659. Shah Jahan Emperor was confined in Agra Fort where he was looked after well by his daughter Jahanara.

Aurangzeb ruled as Emperor for forty nine years viz. 1658 to 1707. The total area in Mughal empire at end of Aurangzeb's reign was more than 3.2 million Square kilometers, population 100-150 million subjects. In a way, we may say that credit for unifying India under a single monarch goes to Aurangzeb. Although he can be rightly credited with virtue of simplicity and austerity unlike his forefathers who mercilessly wasted public money, he spent most of the public money on wars. Impact was the same. He had employed latest weapons like rockets, cannons. It is a pity to contrast him with modern shah Jahanas, who waste public money on building their statues and for personal comforts. We need more aurangzebs and no shahjahans.

In spite of virtues of austerity and simplicity, the fact remains that his pursuit of mindless expansion of territories had reached climax. In those days when means of transport and tracks were slow and rough, the public money got exhausted in war efforts only. Expansion of territory is not enough. It is better to rule well and earn public good will in a smaller territory. A small beautiful garden is better than a big uneven thick forest.

It is said that at fag end of life, Aurangzeb himself could not understand the purpose for which he had lived. He faced very tough resistance by various groups- Sikhs, jats, Satnamis and so on. Shivaji, Maratha warrior, adopted hit and run tactics to fight Mughal Empire. Aurangzeb left a very vast empire with several enemies and weak successors. Consequently, his vast empire almost vanished after his demise.

Was Aurangzeb a fanatic temple demolisher

The most hated Mughal emperor among non Muslims- Hindus and Sikhs and even non Sunni Muslims is undoubtedly Aurangzeb. It is said that best government is that which governs the least. But Aurangzeb made decisions that annoyed many. He introduced zazia tax on non Muslims. However is this really tyrannical? The Muslims pay Zakat. The non muslims paid zazia instead of zakat. Obviously there is nothing wrong with this. However, he forced puritanism on his subjects. He banned wine, music and songs. He felt that various dance forms, vulgar music and nudity were polluting society. This is clealy a gross violation of human rights. But we should not judge him by modern standards of democracy, human rights and liberalism. In those days, emperor was supposed to work in best interests of his subjects as he considered right. It is true that his subjects were mostly non Muslims and so forcing Islamic Puritanism on them was anti secular. But secularism is also a modern concept. The state religion in Aurangzeb's reign was Islam and so he was theoretically right in forcing his beliefs on his subjects. However this is not a pragmatic approach. British rulers later proved most pragmatic. They never interfered with local practices. Even on Sati, they acted only when Raja Ram Mohan Roy intervened. However, we have also to consider that Aurangzeb was an Indian unlike British who never considered India as their home land. His continuous efforts for expansion of empire allowed him very little time to consolidate his gains and give good administration. Had he limited his ambition for expansion, he could give very good administration. In this context, it will be worthwhile to mention Sher Shah Suri who is credited with many achievements including construction of Grand Trunk Road and planting trees.

The worst criticism is that Aurangzeb demolished many temples. However, there is high exaggeration in figure of temples demolished. According to Historian Harbans Mukhia, "In the end, as recently recorded in Richard Eaton's careful tabulation, some 80 temples were demolished between 1192 and 1760 (15 in aurangzeb's reign)". He also comments that Hindu nationalist propagandists claim 60,000 demolitions. Notable temples demolished were Kashi Vishwanath Temple, Kesava Deo temple and somnath temple. Large mosques were constructed in their place.

Ram Puniyani, another historian hold that Aurangzeb was not fanatically anti Hindu. He changed policies from time to time. He banned construction of new temples but permitted repair and maintenance of the existing ones. He is credited with generous donation of jagirs to temples, several firmans (orders) supporting temples and Gurdwaras (sikh religious temples). These include Mahakaleshwar temple of Ujjain, Balaji temple of chitrakoot, Umananda temple (Guwahati) and the shatrunjaya Jain temples. Apparently, there could be purpose in demolishing certain temples. These could be places where anti state elements got shelter. We have seen this even in not so distant past. The terrorists used religious buildings for unholy activities. They understand that they can safely operate from religious place where army and police would not enter without arousing public wrath. It is very probable that during his reign, Aurangzeb had to demolish certain temples for driving out anti state and notorious elements hiding therein.

Conclusion

We need to evaluate the role of Great Fakir Emperor Aurangzeb. He was the greatest emperor who for the first time practised simplicity and austerity and developed the principle that emperor is not owner but trustee of wealth lying in treasury. Even his open air grave in Khuldabad (Aurangabad Maharashtra) is a mark of his simplicity.

http://www.boddunan.com/articles/miscel ... peror.html

salaar
Posts: 635
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2014 8:36 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#2

Unread post by salaar » Sun Apr 27, 2014 3:38 pm

leave the rest how pious was aurangzeb i would just reveal his treachery in getting the powers of state and to become king of india. he collaborated with his brother murad and told him that since he is not a man for this world and he has no intention in grabbing power therefore he would join his forces with murad to defeat dara shikoh as he considered him a better man then dara shikoh, the two forces defeated dara shikoh and during the celebration of victory he mixed poison in the wine glass of murad and killed him, later he ordered his men to blacken the face of his real brother dara shikoh made him sit on a donkey and paraded him in the streets of dehli, later he buried him half into the soil with hands inside and let loose hunter dogs onto him who bit his upper body into pieces. how pious was this king who killed his own brother mercilessly just to become the trustee of the indian state, what a shame.

shehzaada
Posts: 163
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2014 3:04 pm

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#3

Unread post by shehzaada » Sun Apr 27, 2014 3:49 pm

Bring your evidence if you are truthful, dont put baseless allegations from your reading of hindu extremist authors. There are more books\media written maligning the prophet pbuh in vilest of terms than even Yazid . So dont fall for such blind accustions.

Muslim First
Posts: 6893
Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2001 4:01 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#4

Unread post by Muslim First » Sun Apr 27, 2014 9:00 pm

Can we find better things to post under Islam or just creat unnecessary controversies.

AZ is not favorite Muslim King for Bohras

salaar
Posts: 635
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2014 8:36 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#5

Unread post by salaar » Mon Apr 28, 2014 8:41 am

yes why not for aurangzeb you can consult TAREEKH E HIND by Dr Ghulam Mustafa Sufi second book which you can refer is ZULMAT E ADWAAR by Iqbal Ahmed Ansari. some facts can be traced from Ismailies by Farhad Daftari and many more articles can be retrieved on the net.

salaar
Posts: 635
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2014 8:36 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#6

Unread post by salaar » Thu May 01, 2014 1:32 pm

adding another proof of barbarism of laeen Aurangzeb is that Shah Jahan the father of Aurangzeb had to spend the last 8 years of his life in solitary confinement on the orders of his son aurangzeb, during confinement he was provided with a very limited amount of rationed water and during long summer days when when he requested for additional water he was denied, on this he wrote said a stanza in persian that is......... AE PISAR TOU AJAB MUSALMANI....................ZINDARA BA AAB TARSAANI. meaning Oh son you are a weired muslim.........keeping me in prison and depriving me of water.

shehzaada
Posts: 163
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2014 3:04 pm

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#7

Unread post by shehzaada » Thu May 01, 2014 2:42 pm

History is often forged. Dont exaggerate , you will be sorry in the hereafter for slandering pious Muslim Saints. You dont know the truth hence better be silent then destroy your hereafter.

Aurangzeb was a great ruler. I often wonder how people consider ShahJahan as great and Aurangzeb as not. Shahjahan misused the state treasury for his personal needs and built monuments like Taj Mahal. How many of you wondered what exactly was the use of Taj Mahal? For me it is still a wastage of national capital. If Mayavati can be considered as corrupt for builting statues of herself then Shahjahan can be considered the same as well.

After completing Taj Mahal Shahjahan has a plan to built a Black Taj Mahal. That is why Aurangazeb imprisoned him. His brother was a drug addict and during the reign of Shahjahan misusing his power he conducted many treacherous crimes. It is for that he has tried and executed. It is true that he ordered abolition of certain temples.
Unlike his predecessors he didn't encourage people in his court to praise him and give them money. So most of the historians and poets at that time were not fond of him. That is why history is so twisted and distorted. The so called greatness of Akbar and Shah Jahan was created by paying golds to the poets and historians and inscribing their glory on the monuments. If you check the facts you can understand that he never encouraged such persons as he himself lead a simple life by the earnings of his own hand.

The first ruler in India who prohibited Alcoholism, Prostitution, Narcotics, etc. Most Hindus like Akbar over Aurangzeb for his multi-ethnic court where Hindus were favoured. Historian Shri Sharma states that while Emperor Akbar had fourteen Hindu Mansabdars (high officials) in his court, Aurangzeb actually had 148 Hindu high officials in his court (ref: Mughal Government). But this fact is somewhat less known and publicized for prejudiced his reputation.


salaar
Posts: 635
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2014 8:36 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#9

Unread post by salaar » Thu May 01, 2014 3:11 pm

how did you figure out that iam praising shah jahan, he has nothing to do with us just like any other indian king who was interested in his own ayyashi except that he left a monument like taj mahal for generations to come but other then that i see nothing especial about him, here the whole debate is about laeen aurangzeb who was responsible for a series of heinous crimes against people on the name of religion may they be bohras or hindus or sikhs, who gave this laeen the right to pass capital punishment against Syedna Qutbuddin Shaheed, why should anybody force people to believe and practice what they feel is right and on any deviation they would kill them, such rulers to whichever sect they belong may enjoy power and brutalise the masses but not for long and once they are gone people call them tyrants and butchers, no matter how colorful history they order the historians to write but their real deeds are always remembered. even after more then 300 years of his death me and many of those who weep upon our maula Qutbuddin shaheed say laanatullah on this maloon.

shehzaada
Posts: 163
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2014 3:04 pm

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#10

Unread post by shehzaada » Thu May 01, 2014 3:18 pm

bro salar dont get hyper, Even prophet Muhammad pbuh is criticized more in far harsher manner by history forgers , that does not make it the truth.
Have you forgotten Haz Ali a.s burned Nusairis alive for their beliefs?

Each of you lanat will only get converted into hasanat and be credited to Haz Aurangzeb Rah, account as he is innocent of what you accuse him of. And you will be written of as slanderer of Allahs saints.Moreover there are Milliions of Sunni Muslims , Hindus etc who still praise and revere him, far more than the non remarkable Qutubuddin.

salaar
Posts: 635
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2014 8:36 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#11

Unread post by salaar » Thu May 01, 2014 3:40 pm

yes that is the difference qutbuddin for you is SYEDNA WA MOULANA QUTUB KHAN QUTBUDDIN AL SHAHEED for us and since you have given me some advise let me also give you a piece of advise, without knowing both side of the picture ignoring the mazloom and maqtool and taking side of the qatil, murderer you will have to answer on the day on judgment so please beware of your support, for laanat and hasanaat, it is in shareeyat that this exchange stands good for those who are blamed for something they have not committed and who are not involved in gunah e kabira, not for murderers like aurangzeb.

ghulam muhammed
Posts: 11653
Joined: Tue Oct 07, 2008 5:34 pm

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#12

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Thu May 01, 2014 7:23 pm

Whereas Iam not a fan of Aurangzeb and for me he was just an emperor who had his good and bad side. It should be understood that his history alongwith that of many other Muslim rulers has been fabricated and distorted hugely by vested interests like RSS, Hindu Mahasabha and even some British historians. Hence it is important to look at it with an unbiased mindset and then come to any conclusions. A large number of noted historians have written some surprising things about him as under :-

As emperor, he ruled more of India than any previous monarch, but in a court that had become a byword for luxury, he lived a life of austere piety.

He appointed censors of public morals in all important cities to enforce Islamic law, and he tried to put down such practices as drinking, gambling, and prostitution. He forbade the cultivation of narcotics throughout the empire, and in 1664 he issued his first edict forbidding sati or the self-immolation of women on funeral pyres. He also repeatedly denounced the castration of children so they could be sold as eunuchs. In the economic sphere he showed a determined opposition to all illegal exactions and to all taxes which were not authorized by Islamic law. Immediately after his second coronation he abolished the inland transport duty, which amounted to ten percent of the value of goods, and the octroi on all articles of food and drink brought into the cities for sale. Although these measures were partly responsible for Aurangzeb's later financial difficulties, they were popular with the people.

The festivities held on the emperor's birthday, including the custom of weighing him against gold and silver, were discontinued, and the mansabdars were forbidden to offer him the usual presents. The ceremony of darshan, or the public appearance of the emperor to the people, was abandoned in 1679.

Aurangzeb's reign finally saw a complete transformation in Mughal-Afghan relations. Amir Khan, the Mughal governor of Kabul and Peshawar established such order on the frontier between 1678 and 1698 that his wife maintained control of the area for some time after his death.

The ninth guru, Tegh Bahadur, who came to the gaddi in 1664, served in the Mughal army on the Assam frontier for some years, but later returned to eastern Punjab and settled down at Anandpur. He called himself Sacha Badshah (True King), and started levying tribute from the local population. The imperial forces defeated him, and he was taken to Delhi and put to death by Aurangzeb in 1675.

It was Govind Singh who gave the Sikhs their very distinctive symbols—the uncut hair, the steel bangle, the sword—that established their identity as a separate people. The real sufferers from the growing military strength of the Sikhs, who had enrolled a large number of Pathans in their ranks, were the Hindu rajas of the Punjab hills. Many bloody battles were fought between them and the guru. At last they complained to the Mughal governor, who passed on the complaint to Aurangzeb. On the rajas' undertaking to bear the cost of an expedition, Aurangzeb agreed to send forces to assist them in besieging Govind Singh in his stronghold at Anandpur. The guru himself escaped, but his children were executed.

According to certain Sikh accounts, Aurangzeb invited the guru to visit him in the Deccan. Evidence on this point is not conclusive, but it is certain that after this Guru Govind Singh was allowed to live in peace. After Aurangzeb's death his son Bahadur Shah, who was the viceroy of the Punjab before ascending the throne, was on excellent terms with the guru. Later the relations of the Mughals with the Sikhs sharply deteriorated owing to the emergence of Banda, a Hindu religious mendicant, as the leader of the Sikhs.

In 1682 Shambhuji raided Burhanpur and perpetrated such cruelties on the Muslim population that the qazis there sent a manifesto to Aurangzeb upbraiding him. The Mughal emperor, who was concerned about the developments in the Deccan since his rebel son, Prince Akbar, had taken refuge at Shambhuji's court, decided to go south. He reached Aurangabad in the third week of March, 1682, and the last twenty-five years of his life were to be spent in that part of the subcontinent. Bijapur and Golkunda, which often gave shelter to the Maratha raiders, were annexed in 1686 and 1687, and Shambhuji was captured and executed in early 1689, but this did not mean the end of Aurangzeb's troubles in the Deccan. Aurangzeb brought up Shambhuji's son, Shahu, at the court and treated him with great consideration, but his younger brother, Rajaram, took over the Maratha leadership. On his death in April, 1700, his widow, Tara Bai, carried on the struggle.

Aurangzeb had accepted the policy of regulating his government in accordance with strict Islamic law, and many orders implementing this policy were issued. A large number of taxes were abolished which had been levied in India for centuries but which were not authorized by Islamic law.

Another measure which has caused adverse comment is the issue of orders at various stages regarding the destruction of Hindu temples. Originally these orders applied to a few specific cases—such as the temple at Mathura built by Abul Fazl's murderer, to which a railing had been added by Aurangzeb's rival, Dara Shukoh. More far-reaching is the claim that when it was reported to him that Hindus were teaching Muslims their "wicked science," Aurangzeb issued orders to all governors "ordering the destruction of temples and schools and totally prohibiting the teaching and infidel practices of the unbelievers." That such an order was actually given is doubtful; certainly it was never carried out with any thoroughness. Later, the procedure was adopted of closing down rather than destroying the newly built temples in Hindu localities.

The fact that a total ban on the construction of new temples was adopted only by later jurists, and was a departure from the earlier Muslim practice as laid down by Muhammad ibn Qasim in Sind, was no concern of the correct, conscientious, and legal-minded Aurangzeb.

Aurangzeb has often been accused of closing the doors of official employment on the Hindus, but a study of the list of his officers shows this is not so. Actually there were more Hindu officers under him than under any other Mughal emperor. Though this was primarily due to a general increase in the number of officers, it shows that there was no ban on the employment of the Hindus.

So far as Aurangzeb's personal qualities are concerned, however, there is general admiration. R. C. Majumdar writes: "Undaunted bravery, grim tenacity of purpose, and ceaseless activity were some of his prominent qualities. His military campaigns gave sufficient proof of his unusual courage, and the manner in which he baffled the intrigues of his enemies shows him to have been a past master of diplomacy and statecraft. His memory was wonderful, and his industry indefatigable." "He never forgot a face he had once seen or a word that he had once heard." Apart from his devotion to duty, his life was remarkable for its simplicity and purity. His dress, food, and recreations were all extremely simple. He died at the age of ninety, but all his faculties (except his hearing) remained unimpaired.

On grounds of both economy and fidelity to the Islamic law he criticized the Taj Mahal, the tomb of his mother, remarking: "The lawfulness of a solid construction over a grave is doubtful, and there can be no doubt about the extravagance involved

His reign was marked by the extensive grant of patronage and stipends to scholars and students. There were no religious leaders of the caliber of Shah Waliullah or Shaikh Ahmad Sirhindi, but there is no doubt that the foundation of the Islamic religious revival in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries were laid at this time.

His financial difficulties were partly due to the wholesome remission of some eighty taxes, and partly to his refusal to levy any tax not specifically authorized by shariat.

Firuz Jang, the conqueror of Golkunda (whom the emperor held so dear that once when he fell ill and was forbidden melons, Aurangzeb himself gave up this fruit), put to death one Muhammad Aqil on a charge of highway robbery, without formal trial by a qazi. Aurangzeb sternly rebuked him, and asked his wazir to write to the noble that if the heirs of the slain refused to accept the blood-money permitted by law he would have to pass an order of retaliation against him

Perhaps the time to make a final assessment of Aurangzeb has not yet arrived. More than five thousand of his letters are extant, but only a handful have been published, and until this rich material is studied, a proper appraisal of his personality is not possible. At present, evidence about him is fragmentary and contradictory, and his personality was more complex than either his admirers or critics are willing to acknowledge. In the context of conflicting evidence, the tendency for each group is to emphasize the elements supporting its point of view. These verdicts are liable to be modified in the light of the vast material which remains to be utilized, and all judgment of Aurangzeb, at this stage, can only be provisional.

http://www.columbia.edu/itc/mealac/prit ... t2_15.html

salaar
Posts: 635
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2014 8:36 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#13

Unread post by salaar » Fri May 02, 2014 3:23 am

laeen iblees did ibadat for thousands of years but his one act was enough to throw him in the fire of hell forever, we are not interested in knowing how efficient was aurangzebs management in ruling india we are sobbing on the extreme highhandedness that he showed in achieving his objectives, for some reason whenever this person is discussed it makes me recall the army general of pakistan ziaul haq who ruled the country for about 11 years and would like to call himself amirul momineen and wherever he would go his chamchas would raise the slogan of mard e momin mard e haq ziaul haq, this is a character ailment when a person thinks himself as the most pious one and the rest a bunch of mushrikeen, such characters have always brought a bad name to islam and their acts are always condemned later

badrijanab
Posts: 809
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2012 3:19 pm

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#14

Unread post by badrijanab » Fri May 02, 2014 10:21 am

Even 1/2/3 have never dared to falsely claim that they are appointed by Allah, nor anyone from Ummaiyyad or Abbasi dared to make such Godly claims. But Aurangzeb topped all to falsely claim that Aurangzeb (monarch/caliph) is appointed by Allah!!! So besides his all tons of other sins, this claim of him being appointed by Allah makes him sinner not only per Islamic standards but also he is sinner per branched out Sunni sect.

ghulam muhammed
Posts: 11653
Joined: Tue Oct 07, 2008 5:34 pm

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#15

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Sun May 04, 2014 6:40 pm

If Aurangzeb was so much sharia compliant then why did he take part in construction of temples ? Some excerpts from an article on Aurangzeb :-

Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb had constructed a huge temple in Chitrakut (Uttar Pradesh) and made arrangement for the 'bhog' at this temple for generations. Many historians consider Aurangzeb as the most bigot emperor.

However, the old arrangement continues till date. Nearly 323 years back Aurangzeb Alamgir had issued a 'firman' as per which 8 villages (330 bighas of land) were allotted for the upkeep of the temple besides Re 1 every day from the government fund.

Mahant Balram Das of the temple is in possession of the firmaan that was written on brass plate and issued on 19th of Islamic month of Ramzan. As per the decree Sant Balak Das of Allahabad's Kalinjar pargana's Chitrakoot was given 330 bighas of land without any 'lagaan'. The temple is now in a poor state despite enormous funds at the disposal. The discord amongst Mahants has led to the situation, say locals.

Interestingly, Aurangzeb had not only got the temple constructed but also wrote the order of 'rajbhog', himself. The land adjoining the Balaji temple has been encroached by musclemen and the infighting amongst the temple committee has hit the structure, which is crumbling, says the District Magistrate, Chitrakot.

marabu
Posts: 50
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2003 5:01 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#16

Unread post by marabu » Sun May 04, 2014 9:30 pm

May I introduce you to Willam Dalrympmle and his books...you can google it .He has written about Delhi ...city of djinns and of course about the last Mughal emperor who died in Burma.
If anyone is interested in historical documented research with bibliographical attestemants ,please do read his books.Whatever has been so far talked about Aurangzeb is a myth.If you are an Islamist with Wahabi bent( a non muslim is not Human being) than your icon is Aurngzeb. I prefer Akbar's view of all human being one and just following different paths to common goal....Allah or whatever you give a name.
Am a bohri and will die as a bohra but doesn't change my philosophy when looking at rest of world.

shehzaada
Posts: 163
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2014 3:04 pm

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#17

Unread post by shehzaada » Mon May 05, 2014 12:19 am

marabu, with such beliefs you are not even a bohri and your are living a path of convenience and not truth.

A refined individual should not refrain from accepting and following the truth whereever it lies

salaar
Posts: 635
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2014 8:36 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#18

Unread post by salaar » Mon May 05, 2014 3:39 am

yes and those who deviate from accepting the wahabi believes should be crucified hanged or shot down publicly as they are all mushriks and kafirs, am i right shehzada sahib

tasneempati
Posts: 260
Joined: Sun Jan 05, 2014 3:44 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#19

Unread post by tasneempati » Mon May 05, 2014 5:20 am

Shehzaada you are a proven Wahabi, shit of a PIG. Your Aurangzeb was worst Muslim ( like you) in Mughal history. It was bcoz of this lanati mughal empire disintegrated. He was such an Idiot that he killed his own brothers & put his ailing father into prison for the sake of power.

tasneempati
Posts: 260
Joined: Sun Jan 05, 2014 3:44 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#20

Unread post by tasneempati » Mon May 05, 2014 5:27 am

What are your source (s) of these false information. May be your Wahabi gurus asked you to post all these fabricated shit here in this forum which is not meant for you. As you yourself mentioned that history is often forged , so is true with your PIGSHIT articles here.

Sufi monk
Posts: 566
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2012 7:34 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#21

Unread post by Sufi monk » Mon May 05, 2014 6:09 am

guys don't get offended by ignorance of shitzada, he just wears his underwear on his head, and talks from his bottom. :roll:

salaar
Posts: 635
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2014 8:36 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#22

Unread post by salaar » Mon May 05, 2014 7:15 am

shitzaada ha ha ha!

shehzaada
Posts: 163
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2014 3:04 pm

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#23

Unread post by shehzaada » Mon May 05, 2014 10:20 am

childish behavior on display. I am sure you are all grownups , yet you would put a child to shame. esp monginis

marabu
Posts: 50
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2003 5:01 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#24

Unread post by marabu » Mon May 05, 2014 6:35 pm

marabu, with such beliefs you are not even a bohri and your are living a path of convenience and not truth.

A refined individual should not refrain from accepting and following the truth whereever it lies

As shezaada has judged me than perhaps I can say that Ilahil ard is amongst us. :wink: In your exuberance you forget a basic lesson that Allah is only one who is going to judge a person.
Maybe you will be interested to look up on the material I have quoted before you write another post .
I do not judge you or give any opinion about your life so perhaps you can let others have same freedom.

JavedhJuma
Posts: 403
Joined: Sun Mar 30, 2014 2:47 pm

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased v

#25

Unread post by JavedhJuma » Mon May 05, 2014 11:03 pm

shehzaada wrote:bro salar dont get hyper, Even prophet Muhammad pbuh is criticized more in far harsher manner by history forgers , that does not make it the truth.
Have you forgotten Haz Ali a.s burned Nusairis alive for their beliefs? Each of you lanat will only get converted into hasanat and be credited to Haz Aurangzeb Rah, account as he is innocent of what you accuse him of. And you will be written of as slanderer of Allahs saints.Moreover there are Milliions of Sunni Muslims , Hindus etc who still praise and revere him, far more than the non remarkable Qutubuddin.
Is it not true that Aurangzeb imprisoned his family members? Isn't it true that he had non-Sunni-Muslims and Hindus killed? Isn't it true that he had his family members killed?

It is a fact that he had Qutbuddin Shaheed, a very pious man, killed. I haven't heard any Hindu praise Aurangzeb and please do not compare the murderer to Qutbuddin Shaheed. What was his sin? Extinguishing somebody's life because he does not share your views, is not only jahaliyat but cruel and inhuman. Please do not call this Shaitan a good man. He was an evil man. He was a usurper. He probably felt threatened by the popularity of Qutbuddin Shaheed so he decided to have him killed.

In a nutshell Aurangzeb was a narcisst.

Anybody who calls Aurangzeb a pious man needs his brains checked out. He was a rascal and a murderer. Take your blinders off brother.

He was not buried fully, not because he was a good man (worms would eventually find his body) but because he had a phobia.

Anybody whose hands are drenched with blood, whether it be one person's blood or a hundred people's blood, is a murderer. Taking anybody's life is not Islam. Allah SWT is the giver of life and He alone taketh life.

Have you forgotten Haz Ali a.s burned Nusairis alive for their beliefs? Where did you read this? Please refresh my memory. Refer me to a book where this garbage is mentioned.

Do not compare Prophet SAW and Hazarat Ali AS with Aurangzeb, the murderer.

zaheer
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Feb 28, 2016 9:35 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased view

#26

Unread post by zaheer » Sun Feb 28, 2016 7:03 pm

Many people are aware that Aurangzeb r.a. destroyed Hindu temples, but the truth is still hidden.

He destroyed temples ands dargaah's(chollas) too. Chillaas are the places where there is no any person grave in real . It is only a stone in name of that Auliya Allah grave. Eg. Khwajaa Gareeb nawaazz grave is in Ajmer, but some one knows that khwajaa stood at Delhi for some reason at one tree hen there people make a chillaa of his stood place just n respect of Him, but this is not allowed in Islam. this is like stone worship as there is only stone kept but not the real grave.

During Aurangzeb r.a period, there were large number of mass of people which were involved in this chills dargaah, and these false samaadhees of Hindus, After discussion with his court masters, Aurangzeb made decision that he will save Indian people from going to darkness. During those days there were many people who were misguided in the name of religion and looted too.

So now Aurangzeb r.a. took initiative wholly in his hands though against the motive of many Muslims, and hindoos which used to loot the people in these so called dargaahs ( chollas) and temple( false samaadhees) . Aurangzeb started to visit these places and greeted them in an Islamic form " Assalaamualaykoom" , He was having the power of hearing those things that common man can't hear, so if there is a real samadhi, or real grave, the person in that grave used to respond and used to greet back to Aurangzeb r.a. and if the answer does not come, then Aurangzeb used to call people to un-dig the grave to show all people. In that time He made destroyed many false temples and chillaas, and saved many real graves after hearing answer from the grave. One day Aurangzeb r.a. went as usual to visit one grave, he greeted, but there was no answer from the grave, so he started digging the grave, after some time the reply came from the grave "Vaalaykoomassalaam" . Aurangzeb R.a. stopped and asked for the late reply, the grave said, ”we too offer worship to our creator and I was in Namaaz so I didn't answered you." From that day, Aurangzeb made sorry to that grave and stopped this technique to not to involve graves for peoples fault and did made other regulations and educated the people about it. Such an honoured Emperor of India , where he lived like a fakeer and took nothing from the treasure, and earned himself, He had takwaa(Allah's fear, and whatever he used to do, it was for only Allah) . He made jaziya law for hundoos who were wealthy to travel , same like zakaat for Muslims in Islam, but people of scriptures criticised Him because he never encouraged their doings. He established the perfect humanism from darkness., but today people forgot the good doings and twisted the real truth and humiliating the praiseful Emperor.

But the things will change InShaaAllah. Truth will prevail.

SBM
Posts: 6335
Joined: Sun May 09, 2004 4:01 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased view

#27

Unread post by SBM » Sun Feb 28, 2016 8:04 pm

,
He was having the power of hearing those things that common man can't hear, so if there is a real samadhi, or real grave, the person in that grave used to respond and used to greet back to Aurangzeb r.a.
Where did you get this information? :roll: :x

humanbeing
Posts: 2195
Joined: Sun Nov 20, 2011 2:30 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased view

#28

Unread post by humanbeing » Mon Feb 29, 2016 4:49 am

zaheer wrote: Aurangzeb started to visit these places and greeted them in an Islamic form " Assalaamualaykoom" , He was having the power of hearing those things that common man can't hear, so if there is a real samadhi, or real grave, the person in that grave used to respond and used to greet back to Aurangzeb r.a. and if the answer does not come, then Aurangzeb used to call people to un-dig the grave to show all people. In that time He made destroyed many false temples and chillaas, and saved many real graves after hearing answer from the grave. One day Aurangzeb r.a. went as usual to visit one grave, he greeted, but there was no answer from the grave, so he started digging the grave, after some time the reply came from the grave "Vaalaykoomassalaam" . Aurangzeb R.a. stopped and asked for the late reply, the grave said, ”we too offer worship to our creator and I was in Namaaz so I didn't answered you." From that day, Aurangzeb made sorry to that grave and stopped this technique to not to involve graves for peoples fault and did made other regulations and educated the people about it. .
Wow ! this sounds like a mojiza from muffy maula’s camp .. is it possible that kothari clan is a generation of Aurengzeb .. the grave whisperer !!
:D :D

qutub_mamajiwala
Posts: 1008
Joined: Tue Jul 23, 2013 4:17 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased view

#29

Unread post by qutub_mamajiwala » Sun May 29, 2016 5:34 am

Aurangzeb Employed Thousand People to Destroy This Temple for 3 Years. Read He Failed Miserably

http://satyavijayi.com/aurangzeb-employ ... miserably/

anajmi
Posts: 13403
Joined: Wed Jan 10, 2001 5:01 am

Re: Aurangzeb The Great Mughal Fakir Emperor: A non biased view

#30

Unread post by anajmi » Sun May 29, 2016 7:19 am

It seems to be a mojiza temple. Perfect for worshipping idols. You should install your's in that temple and become a pujari.