Bohras looking for help

The purpose of this Forum is to highlight and discuss issues pertaining to specific Jamats. Please use this space responsibly and report facts. We reserve the right to edit/delete posts that we find are irrelevant and based on gossip and hearsay.
Admin
Posts: 657
Joined: Fri Dec 08, 2000 5:01 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#91

Unread post by Admin » Wed May 29, 2013 9:18 am

anajmi wrote:One question though, do the questions get re-directed to the proper channels? Does the Admin inform the people who send these emails seeking help that this is not the right place to take care of these issues?
We re-direct them whenever possible and we do inform them that they are sending their messages to the wrong address.



Nameless
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2011 10:33 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#92

Unread post by Nameless » Wed May 29, 2013 2:07 pm

People invariably visit this website because if you google 'dawoodi bohras' it leads to www.dawoodi-bohras.com. It is not evident that this site belongs to the Progressives.



Bohra spring
Posts: 1233
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2012 8:37 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#93

Unread post by Bohra spring » Wed May 29, 2013 2:15 pm

Nameless wrote:People invariably visit this website because if you google 'dawoodi bohras' it leads to http://www.dawoodi-bohras.com. It is not evident that this site belongs to the Progressives.
Wow really ...someone who has lived in oppressive orthodoxy accidentally landing on this site , cannot feel strange to read the titles , topics and not know this is not a Kothar approved site? And then innocently sends a message to the Admin via contact us, yet we call them novices, but hilariously thinking Admin means Amil in web speak? :mrgreen: Did someone comment elsewhere we bohras have a deficient mental capacity, not really



Admin
Posts: 657
Joined: Fri Dec 08, 2000 5:01 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#94

Unread post by Admin » Thu May 30, 2013 9:34 am

Subject: dawoodi qutbi bohra na bara ma janvu che
Message: Dawoodi qutbi bohra mazoom saheb ye suru kidu che par su kam em kidu che mane ehni puri vat janvu che



Grayson
Posts: 293
Joined: Fri Mar 22, 2013 2:23 pm

Re: Bohras looking for help

#95

Unread post by Grayson » Thu May 30, 2013 9:56 am

BS,
People don't read things through on this site and forums and possibly aren't net savvy which is why they may unknowingly send these messages. Whether they know what it is or not, they ask for help and Admin smartly posts it here. Nameless's point has merit in regards to people unfamiliar with such novelties.

Admin,
If you could redirect the user to this thread: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=8141, although there's a lot of waffle to go through. In short: there's no Qutbi Bohras as of now. But there's unrest and guesswork.



ghulam muhammed
Posts: 11653
Joined: Tue Oct 07, 2008 5:34 pm

Re: Bohras looking for help

#96

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Thu May 30, 2013 4:37 pm

Admin wrote:Subject: dawoodi qutbi bohra na bara ma janvu che

Message: Dawoodi qutbi bohra mazoom saheb ye suru kidu che par su kam em kidu che mane ehni puri vat janvu che
Now this message can never appear here unless abdes are not satisfied in the manner in which the whole drama is enacted.



Grayson
Posts: 293
Joined: Fri Mar 22, 2013 2:23 pm

Re: Bohras looking for help

#97

Unread post by Grayson » Thu May 30, 2013 4:40 pm

Or it could be because they simply have no clue and are flamed by the onslaught of gossip. Your guess is as good as mine.



Admin
Posts: 657
Joined: Fri Dec 08, 2000 5:01 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#98

Unread post by Admin » Mon Jul 08, 2013 10:31 am

Subject: for financial help
Message: help us i financial for future studies as two sisters are studying in higher classes and my father income is not sufficient for our further studies and no one else in our family is a man for financial help...
--------------------
We can provide the email address to anyone who's willing to help. Please PM us. - Admin



Al Zulfiqar
Posts: 4609
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2006 5:01 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#99

Unread post by Al Zulfiqar » Mon Jul 08, 2013 9:38 pm

Admin wrote:Subject: for financial help
Message: help us i financial for future studies as two sisters are studying in higher classes and my father income is not sufficient for our further studies and no one else in our family is a man for financial help...
--------------------
We can provide the email address to anyone who's willing to help. Please PM us. - Admin
admin,

please pm me their contacts and we will see what our foundation can do if they qualify.



Admin
Posts: 657
Joined: Fri Dec 08, 2000 5:01 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#100

Unread post by Admin » Tue Jul 30, 2013 9:22 am

Subject: Mawat
Message: 50000mawasat ni araz che



stranger
Posts: 517
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2011 8:27 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#101

Unread post by stranger » Tue Jul 30, 2013 5:55 pm

Sad to see so many needy peoples crying out for help. Its just a drop out of ocean. There are many more who dont have access to even internet or either dont know how to operate and approach. I believe that lakhs of bohras are paying waajebaat, in thousands, in lakhs and in crores.
May Allah bless them with more and more wealth. I dont have issue with it. aapko bharna hai bharo. aapki marzi.
but what my point is what if they even started to pay 10% of it to any local and needy bohra around. [ Old, Widow, Poor, Patient, Student. Many Many are there. I am sure there are many such bohra in every city and town. ]. Then also it will be tremendous service to needy. If any bohra be it even orthodox, abde, hard core, is reading this post of mine then please do think ab it, brothers and sisters. Give it a serious thought this year and let execute this in next Ramadan because :-
[ Jinke paas already bahut hai, Unhe bina maange dene wale bhi bahut hai....lekin bahut zaruratmand aise bhi hai jinhe adad zarurat hai, lekin yaa to wo sharm ke maare maang nahi paate yaa yu kahe ki unhe maangne se bhi nahi mil paata kuchh ]. So please come forward and help the people on your individual level.
I am not asking you not to pay waajebaat, I am not asking you not to believe in Sydena (TUS) and his mansoos. I am not asking you to shave your beard. I am not asking you to remove your topi. I am not asking you to join reformist bohras. I am not asking you to leave your Aqeeda and Faith.
What i am requesting everyone is whatever waajebaat you are planning or suppose to give there..Just cut it short by 10% and distribute those 10% to whom you think need it most.

Please give it a second thought.



humanbeing
Posts: 2195
Joined: Sun Nov 20, 2011 2:30 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#102

Unread post by humanbeing » Wed Jul 31, 2013 10:35 am

Good to see your post stranger ! after a long time !

Appreciate your thoughts and intent. Inshallah, it will awaken many hearts and conscience.

Inspite of heavy payout in wajebaats, there are abdes who extend a humble donation when volunteers approach for donations.

Apart from financial assistance, what we bohras must emulate is to do charity with efforts. There may be lot of rich bohras who are willing to give away wealth, they do not have the time to get to grass roots of problems.

Bohraji & his team do a wonderful job of putting efforts and resource into helping people.

I add to the plea of ‘stranger’ and urge educated bohra brothers and sisters to share their knowledge / skills / expertise with needy. There are students who can afford the fees of school but not extra expensive tuitions. There are men & women who can be groomed in vocational skills to earn a livelihood.

A bohra doctor / civil engineer / architect / professor can offer his advise at premium discount to needy bohras.



wise_guy
Posts: 700
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 5:52 pm

Re: Bohras looking for help

#103

Unread post by wise_guy » Fri Aug 02, 2013 5:34 am

Its very simple. Those who pay wajebaat of 52xxxxxxxxx USD/INR/GPB/AED/KWD etc, it is just to show the world that he has the moolah and is a big shot as people who pay huge wajebat sums become known in the public through word of mouth etc. Wajebaat is just a medium of getting famous, especially amongst the nouveau riche class of abdes including that who went to Middle East and made it big in a short time. On the other hand, helping others doesn't grab much attention. Add to it the Sales and Marketing team of the Kothar (read local Aamils) or should I say Vasuli goons (such as those sent by the Indian banks to get the loan money from defaulters by intimidation etc).. Kothar Inc can put the giant capitalists American corporations to shame.
stranger wrote:Sad to see so many needy peoples crying out for help. Its just a drop out of ocean. There are many more who dont have access to even internet or either dont know how to operate and approach. I believe that lakhs of bohras are paying waajebaat, in thousands, in lakhs and in crores.
May Allah bless them with more and more wealth. I dont have issue with it. aapko bharna hai bharo. aapki marzi.
but what my point is what if they even started to pay 10% of it to any local and needy bohra around. [ Old, Widow, Poor, Patient, Student. Many Many are there. I am sure there are many such bohra in every city and town. ]. Then also it will be tremendous service to needy. If any bohra be it even orthodox, abde, hard core, is reading this post of mine then please do think ab it, brothers and sisters. Give it a serious thought this year and let execute this in next Ramadan because :-
[ Jinke paas already bahut hai, Unhe bina maange dene wale bhi bahut hai....lekin bahut zaruratmand aise bhi hai jinhe adad zarurat hai, lekin yaa to wo sharm ke maare maang nahi paate yaa yu kahe ki unhe maangne se bhi nahi mil paata kuchh ]. So please come forward and help the people on your individual level.
I am not asking you not to pay waajebaat, I am not asking you not to believe in Sydena (TUS) and his mansoos. I am not asking you to shave your beard. I am not asking you to remove your topi. I am not asking you to join reformist bohras. I am not asking you to leave your Aqeeda and Faith.
What i am requesting everyone is whatever waajebaat you are planning or suppose to give there..Just cut it short by 10% and distribute those 10% to whom you think need it most.

Please give it a second thought.



SBM
Posts: 6140
Joined: Sun May 09, 2004 4:01 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#104

Unread post by SBM » Fri Aug 02, 2013 10:26 pm

Br Stranger
Welcome back. Very appropriate post at very appropriate time. Alhamdulliah many on this forum have opened their pockets to help people in Ahmedabad, a scheme started by Br Bohraji last year. The trend has continued and many who liked your post have contributed towards that cause.
Br Bohraji has been busy between the jobs and the work is getting done. Inshallaha once he is settled down with his new job, he will be providing all
the information about how many families were once again helped by the generosity of many forum members. May Allah reward them for their kindness and also those who are helping Mumineen in their time of need from this forum



Admin
Posts: 657
Joined: Fri Dec 08, 2000 5:01 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#105

Unread post by Admin » Mon Sep 16, 2013 10:06 am

Subject: garibi
Message: salam e jamil,
hame yaha gani mushkil ma che.vepar ma nuksaan thayo je pase hatu sub vechi lidu have kai nathi ane haji karjo che,
bejo vepar shuru kido che magar nahi chalto.
so pls help us..



ghulam muhammed
Posts: 11653
Joined: Tue Oct 07, 2008 5:34 pm

Re: Bohras looking for help

#106

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Mon Sep 16, 2013 4:14 pm

The above is a worldwide state of affairs but it doesn't make any difference to Kothar whose only aim is to extort as much as they can irrespective of the ground realities.



Al Fateh
Posts: 220
Joined: Wed Nov 07, 2012 4:42 pm

Re: Bohras looking for help

#107

Unread post by Al Fateh » Mon Sep 16, 2013 7:46 pm

abde53 wrote:
Bohra spring wrote:$3200 barakat for a 1kw systems (4 lights 2 fans LCD tv ) when ebay is selling them for kit $1,500 and battery for $650
The guy is making a cool profit on sell and installation...

are western abdes falling for the con and giving donations and does the poor abdes in India paying too ?
Bohra Spring Bhai
How did Rs 60,000 became $ 3200 dollars It is 1$ equal to 50 rupees so it is only about $ 1200.00 With your own calculation kit at ebay 1500 plus 650 equls 2150 which will be 1,07,500 rupees. I know you want to bring revolution but be careful and double check before you blame people for their good work. If that is how who calculated about bring reform in DB good luck. :roll:
abde idiot come out of your small shop and look around, 1$ equals to 63 rupees and 3200=201600.

use this

http://www.xe.com



Admin
Posts: 657
Joined: Fri Dec 08, 2000 5:01 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#108

Unread post by Admin » Tue Sep 17, 2013 9:41 am

Admin wrote:Subject: garibi
Message: salam e jamil,
hame yaha gani mushkil ma che.vepar ma nuksaan thayo je pase hatu sub vechi lidu have kai nathi ane haji karjo che,
bejo vepar shuru kido che magar nahi chalto.
so pls help us..
We wrote back to this person asking him to contact the local jamat and aamil for help. And here is what he wrote back:
...................................
Subject:Re: garibi

Message: salam e jamil,
saheb me sagli jagah contact kari lida che.
na to jamat na ki aamil. koi nathi sun tu.
yaha to bus lewa nu hoye to lai ley par aap wa ma kai nathi aaptu.
aape to su karzan hassana gold hoye to laiye ne.
yaha to jaman na rupya nathi hota kiwar gahr ma.
saheb pls agar gaam na aamil ne kai keawa jao to jamaat na pase mokle ane jamaat aamil na pase,
have aap batwo kaha jaey hume.
su garib nu koi nathi.kim rupya wala nej har souliyat mile che?
pls reply as soon as.
shukran.



SBM
Posts: 6140
Joined: Sun May 09, 2004 4:01 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#109

Unread post by SBM » Tue Sep 17, 2013 10:32 am

Bohraji Bhai
Do we have any left over money from Ahmedabad Poverty Fund which can be used to help this family. With your contacts in India, you may be able to contact this family and may be provide some assistance. I am willing to contribute if done thru proper channel. Please count me in for the financial help. May Allah ease his difficulties and bless him with happiness.
I HUMBLY REQUEST AND BEG EVERY ONE ON THIS FORUM TO HELP THIS FAMILY WHICH CAN BE DONE THRU BOHRAJI AND ADMINISTRATION OF THE FORUM



anajmi
Posts: 13399
Joined: Wed Jan 10, 2001 5:01 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#110

Unread post by anajmi » Tue Sep 17, 2013 1:25 pm

Adam, zinger, AbdeABCCNN, progticide and other abdes on this forum, it is time for you to put your words into action for this guy and help him out. Not that any of you have the cojones to do anything about it!!



ghulam muhammed
Posts: 11653
Joined: Tue Oct 07, 2008 5:34 pm

Re: Bohras looking for help

#111

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Tue Sep 17, 2013 3:44 pm

Admin wrote:yaha to bus lewa nu hoye to lai ley par aap wa ma kai nathi aaptu.
That's the reason that Kothar under the leadership of the Dai is aptly called LENA BANK and not DENA BANK !!



Humsafar
Posts: 2483
Joined: Sat Dec 16, 2000 5:01 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#112

Unread post by Humsafar » Tue Sep 17, 2013 4:44 pm

anajmi wrote:Adam, zinger, AbdeABCCNN, progticide and other abdes on this forum, it is time for you to put your words into action for this guy and help him out. Not that any of you have the cojones to do anything about it!!
That is a vain hope. Their concern is the infallibility and love of Dai. On that subject they can work themselves up into a froth. But the reality of Bohra life, the misery and poverty they live in, is not worthy of their consideration. Please do not shake their ivory tower.



Admin
Posts: 657
Joined: Fri Dec 08, 2000 5:01 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#113

Unread post by Admin » Fri Oct 11, 2013 9:14 am

A message we received by email. If anybody is in a position to help we can pass along the contact info:
------------------------------------
Subject: Pls HELP me.......
Message: Salam to all, Dear i am from Mahuva, gujarat and due to some problems one of Onion Dehydration company has not clear my salary & commision of Rs. 40160/- only.
They are bohari, earlier some months they opposed to give my salary and i am a medium class person so pls pls HELP me.
I will be thankful to your if you help me because now i am in need of fund, my aunty is admitted in hospital and i have tried lots but they are not about to clear my account.
Your's Thankful,



ghulam muhammed
Posts: 11653
Joined: Tue Oct 07, 2008 5:34 pm

Re: Bohras looking for help

#114

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Fri Oct 11, 2013 4:15 pm

Admin wrote:Dear i am from Mahuva, gujarat and due to some problems one of Onion Dehydration company has not clear my salary & commision of Rs. 40160/- only.

They are bohari, earlier some months they opposed to give my salary and i am a medium class person so pls pls HELP me.
The company referred to seems to be, M/s.Vadiwala Dehydration Pvt. Ltd., Details as appearing on their website is as under:-

Vadiwala is today one of the most prestigious and esteemed companies of the industry in the area of manufacture of dried onions and others vegetables. The company, since 2005, is progressing by leaps and bounds and has not looked back. Vadiwala’s founders Mr. Shabbirali Vadiwala and Mr. Hatimali Vadiwala are company’s mentors under whose guidance Vadiwala scaled news heights. Vadiwala Dehydration is recognized by the Indian government. The company has a plant at Mahuva, Dist. Bhavnagar, Gujarat and is also one of the recognized companies in this field.


Registered Office:

41, Nutan Nagar,
Near Meghdoot Cinema,
Mahuva - 364290
Dist. Bhavnagar
(Gujarat - India)

Factory:

Umaniyavadar Road,
Mahuva - 364290,
Dist. Bhavnagar,
(Gujarat - India)

Contact:

Iqbal Vadiwala (India)
0091 99048 80952
Fax: 0091 2844 247684

Haider Vadiwala (Import & Export)
0091 99048 80952

Murtuza Vadiwala (Purchase)
0091 99249 78452

Email:

info@vadiwaladehydration.com
vadiwaladehydration@gmail.com

http://www.vadiwaladehydration.com/the_company.htm



Admin
Posts: 657
Joined: Fri Dec 08, 2000 5:01 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#115

Unread post by Admin » Thu Oct 17, 2013 10:43 am

Subject: hospitel/help/pls
Message: pls,,,help,,,me...my..sister.22day...in...hospitel..saifee....i.am.very..poor...pls....help....me....
my...sister...name...haseena...bed...no..525..i.c.u



Admin
Posts: 657
Joined: Fri Dec 08, 2000 5:01 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#116

Unread post by Admin » Thu Oct 17, 2013 1:05 pm

Subject: Need Financial Help
Message: As Salaam...
I am Huzefa from Secunderabad. I have been watching and reading your forums and articles for past few years. I am really attracted and touched by the columns and articles written by our fellow Bohras. I also suffered once. Still suffering. I am staying with my family. I myself helped many peoples,jamaat and aayans with money and other things, presuming better future, better health and better life. Today the situation is different. I am in huge debt. I almost sold everything yet the debt is not over. Unfortunately I took money on Interests to pay debt... But now... I cannot even pay interests. My s financial situation is getting day by day. No jamaat aayans or local mumeen who spent lacs of money unnecessary on Nazwa and other things, have come forward for help.
I am looking forward to you. Please help me to get out from debt. I faced many things and I experience nightmares with local jamaat and Mumbai BQHS. You are indeed my last hope to survive. I need funds to clear my debt and to come out from Interests. I shall return once my business flourish. Please come forward and help us.



wise_guy
Posts: 700
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 5:52 pm

Re: Bohras looking for help

#117

Unread post by wise_guy » Fri Oct 18, 2013 3:36 pm

Admin wrote:Subject: Need Financial Help
Message: As Salaam...
I am Huzefa from Secunderabad. I have been watching and reading your forums and articles for past few years. I am really attracted and touched by the columns and articles written by our fellow Bohras. I also suffered once. Still suffering. I am staying with my family. I myself helped many peoples,jamaat and aayans with money and other things, presuming better future, better health and better life. Today the situation is different. I am in huge debt. I almost sold everything yet the debt is not over. Unfortunately I took money on Interests to pay debt... But now... I cannot even pay interests. My s financial situation is getting day by day. No jamaat aayans or local mumeen who spent lacs of money unnecessary on Nazwa and other things, have come forward for help.
I am looking forward to you. Please help me to get out from debt. I faced many things and I experience nightmares with local jamaat and Mumbai BQHS. You are indeed my last hope to survive. I need funds to clear my debt and to come out from Interests. I shall return once my business flourish. Please come forward and help us.



Gulaame Islaam
Posts: 49
Joined: Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:06 pm

Re: Bohras looking for help

#118

Unread post by Gulaame Islaam » Thu Oct 24, 2013 3:51 pm

I am a Dr practising medicine for the last 40 some years. It was with Karimjee Jivanjee family's help that I could study medicine and help my family. I shall ever be greateful to them They did so much for our community as well as the East African countries as a whole it is amazing. Our community depended on them for so much and received from them so much, with no strings attached; yet our so called leaders have managed to turn their followers against them. Where is gratitude for all they did?. May God bless them more.
Bohra spring wrote:As one opens this aesthetically well-presented book with an ancient-looking photo of three men in front of a historically prominent Zanzibar door, Hatim A. Karimjee tells us of how he met Gijsbert Oonk, and decided to embark on this journey with him. Hatim A. Karimjee claims that this book is the author’s story, a complete stranger to Karimjee Jivanjee family. Yet 200 years of an entrepreneurial family history could not have been written without the full dedication of the family members and mainly Hatim Karimjee’s ‘life mission’. The book is very appropriately, dedicated to the ancestors who dared to cross the ‘kalapani’ – the dark waters of the Indian Ocean.

The Karimjee family originally came from Mandvi, India. They are Muslim Dawoodi Bohras. This fact becomes important in the book when later on we witness the philanthropic nature of the family following one of the basic principles of Islam. The author describes the book as that of ‘business history, where business, politics, social welfare and family walked hand in hand’(p13).

What is unusual of this family history is the fact that it has survived 200 years of passing down their business ethics through family. The author claims that kings of trade and commerce – such as Tharia Topan (1823–1891), Sewa Haji (1851–1897), Alidina Visram (1851–1916) and Nasser Veerjee (1865–1942) – were there but survived one or two generations only ,and have vanished from economic playing field of East Africa. In 1950s, the Karimjees were referred to as ‘the Merchant Princes of East Africa’.

The second unusual fact is that they availed all their business and family documents to the author so that 200 years of history is documented for future generations of the family. It is indeed unusual for the business community to lay bare their story.

The book is divided into seven chapters. This follows the author’s two basic principles. The first is telling the history of the family. Chapter one sets the scene, while the second tells us of the cultural and economic connections between Asia and Africa and why the Karimjees moved to Africa. The third chapter goes through the business history (1880–1924), while the fourth chapter tells us of the transition from trade to estates. Chapter five gives us a picture of the political turmoil of independence of Tanganyika/Zanzibar and the Arusha Declaration (1964–1990). Chapter six shows us the importance of East Africa in the global economy then, and the role of Asian community, while the last chapter takes us through the 21st century Karimjee family.

The book also follows the author’s second principle, presenting four portraits of ‘historical champions’ as he calls them. Intermittently set between chapters, the author gives us an insight into the personalities who played catalytic roles in the family business and linked it to national politics and the global economy. Two of his champions were knighted by the Queen of England. Through documentation of the portraits we as readers travel through historical times, places and spaces of innovativeness that these charismatic personalities created in their quest for living their full lives.

PORTRAITS

A) Yusufali Karimjee (1882–1966) (Chapter 3)

He was known as the ‘Lion of Zanzibar’ and was instrumental in setting up the Indian National Association of Zanzibar, which was triggered by the 50 per cent increase in customs duty by the British rulers. He was also a bold entrepreneur who did business from Hanover to Japan, and later married a Japanese woman, thus introducing a world citizenry to the Karimjee family. He was knighted by the Queen of England for his numerous philanthropic works and was instrumental in giving the greatest gift, The Karimjee Hall, in 1955 to the City Council of Dar es Salaam while he was a member of Legislative Council. This hall later became the House of Parliament. His son, Abdulkarim (see D below) became an ardent supporter of the independence movement of Tanganyika.

B) Abdalla Mohamedali Karimjee (1899–1978)

He was known as the sisal baron (p18) of Tanga, and received an OBE (Officer of the British Empire) in 1961. He was instrumental in the move of the family from trades to estates (Chapter 4). Charismatic in nature he went to South Africa on a pikipiki (motorbike) to negotiate a family deal with Caltex for the distribution of petroleum in 1924.

He also became a member of the Tanganyika Legislative Council, attended the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953 and welcomed Princess Margaret to Tanga in 1956. His second marriage was to a German woman. Since the couple travelled often to Europe, this fact created an issue when the Germans lost the war to the British. Through ‘silent lobbying’, according to the author, Abdallah managed to buy the former German-owned estates taken over by the British Custodians of Enemy Properties after World War II, which were being sold to European companies only – the Kisangara Sisal Estate. He was another member of Karimjee family who internationalised the family and frequented Davos, Switzerland for holidays with his children.

C) Tayabali Karimjee (1897-1987)

Born in Zanzibar, he went to school in Zanzibar. He was known to give away 60 per cent of his earnings to charities, building schools and hospitals in East Africa. He was knighted in 1955 and became a close friend of the Sultan of Zanzibar. He established the prestigious Tayabali Karimjee Cricket Cup and Scout Club with a passion. In 1931, he was nominated the unofficial member of Legislative Council by the Sultan. He walked out of the Legislative Council when it passed the Clove Monopoly Bill on 23 July 1937. He saw the bill as benefiting Europeans to the detriment of Zanzibaris. He also saw the bill separating the financiers (the Asians) from the landowners (the Arabs) in order to control both groups politically as a hidden agenda of the British colonialists. Mass walkout from the Legislative Assembly followed and all shops and businesses closed on that day in Zanzibar.

D) Abdulkarim Karimjee(1906 –1977)

The son of Yusufali Karimjee, he served as deputy Mayor in 1952 and 1956 and Mayor of Dar es Salaam in 1954 and 1957. In 1959 he was he was appointed the Speaker of the Tanganyika Legislative Council. With the independence of Tanganyika, he became the first speaker of parliament, which sat in Karimjee Hall. He presided over the independence ceremony and had gone through a process of a nominated parliament to an elected one, with increased membership from 29 to 81.

From 1961–70, he became the vice chancellor of University College of Dar es Salaam, director of National Development Corporation (NDC) and National Bank of Commerce (NBC) and founded the Tanganyika National Library.

Julius Nyerere, who became the first president of Tanganyika, was a close friend during the independence struggle. He supported Nyerere in his policy of 1967 Arusha Declaration and the 1971 Building Aqcuisition Act. Like Nyerere he believed that ‘the well-to-do and well-educated peoples of East Africa were obliged to share their knowledge and wealth with the disadvantaged people’. The author claims that he ‘foresaw difficult times for Asians in East Africa but he maintained his position of serving the country’. The family lost much of their property and most of them left East Africa. A six-page list of properties owned by the Karimjees is given at the end of the book (pp162-67).

Between 1824–1861, the Karimjees accumulated capital and grew into a prominent trading family. ‘The study of this family demonstrates how Asian families played a vital economic and political role in East Africa’, states the author. He sees this as the advantage of basic research and sets out to balance the ‘economic environment’ and the ‘context of the Karimjee family history’ through out the chapters of the book. The author, very ably, takes us through various historical epochs of East African history – like the transfer of capital of Sultan Seyyid Said from Oman to Zanzibar in 1832 and its impact on commerce; the abolition of slave trade and how it weakened the Sultan’s empire; and how the British and Germans took slices of East Africa and Africa as a whole after the Berlin Conference of 1884. They left Zanzibar and Pemba to be ruled by Seyyid Said but later on declared it a British protectorate. Thus emerged the complex political economy of Zanzibar in the 19th century.

According to the author, ‘The Arabs owned plantations and produced cloves and spices. Some were involved in the caravan trade, collecting ivory from the mainland, and in the slave trade. The Indian moneylenders who neither owned land nor ventured into the interior themselves were half way up the social ladder…’(p14). There is a section in the book dedicated to sisal production when the family moved from the ‘trades to estate’ phase of their development. The turbulent political chapter takes us through the various decrees, the nationalisation phase tied to the socialism phase – ‘Ujamaa’ – of Tanganyika, the union between Zanzibar and Tanganyika, and the formation of Tanzania, giving us insights into how political development affected the lives of not only businesses but also the people that lived through it. Tayabali Karimjee, born and bred in Zanzibar and who had given 60 per cent of his earnings to philanthropic deeds in East Africa, died in Karachi in 1987, with the words ‘I don’t belong here; I am waiting for the bus to Zanzibar’, thus raising the identity question of the east African Asians of today also.

The author also takes us through migration connectivity. In the case of Karimjee family, he talks of the adventurous spirit of the Mandvi sailors, from where the family originated. The seafaring history was indicated by the vastness of dhow building at Mandvi, the booming trade with Aden, Muscat, Mogadishu, Zanzibar and Malindi; it is said that Vasco de Gama used the Mandvi sailors in his journeys. The monsoon winds provided the rhythm of the trade between the continents surrounding the Indian Ocean dating back 2000 years. ‘…Vasco de Gama was surprised to encounter Arabs and Indians in Mozambique, Mombasa and Lindi in 1497’, observes the author.

However it is only in 19th century that South Asians began to settle on the East African coast. The author demonstrates this with maps of settlements in the book, and also documents the first Bohra mosque. In late 19th century the Karimjees established their household at 236 Hurumzi Street, which still stands, now a hotel. They now became settlers and Africa became their home and their future.

The first Bohra graveyard near Mnazi Moja has a tombstone (p31) of Alibhai Karimjee(1851–1883), his wife Fatema (1923), Hassanali Alibhai Karimjee (1872–1918) and Mohamedali Karimjee(1876–1940).

The author analyses the era of trading empire building of the Karimjees between 1880–1924, when political power was in the hands of the Germans, British and the Sultan. In 1832, Seyyid Said made Zanzibar his capital and with him came many Asian traders and financiers from Oman.

Jairam Sewjee was his custom collector who in turn convinced Buddhabhoy Karimjee to explore the opportunities in Zanzibar. In 1839 the British signed a pact with Seyyid Said to engage in trade on the island, thus establishing a consulate which ‘gave Asians a sense of security in dealing with Arab aristocracy’, states the author. He sees this era as having three factors which shaped the history of Karimjee Jivanjee family history: Firstly, the arrival of Europeans opened up trade with Europe. Secondly, Tanganyika became a more stable political economy and adopted legislative order. Thirdly, the contribution of the ‘three great Karimjee tycoons who directed the family to a new level of wealth, political ambitions and charity’.

It is this era which saw extensive property acquirements, including the now Zanzibar People’s Bank which was nationalised from the Karimjees. The most outstanding feature of this building is its door, which is known as the ‘Mona Lisa of the Zanzibar doors’. This building used to belong to the German merchant Rudolph Heinrich Ruete who sold it to the Karimjees. He married the famous Princess Salme who later on wrote the first historical book ‘Memoirs of a Princess’, documenting Zanzibar as it was then.

By now the Karimjees had established an impeccable reputation. With extensive travels by Yusufali Karimjee in Europe, Japan, Germany, Oman and beyond, coupled with home knowledge of marketable products by Hassanali and Mohamedali, the company bagged trading deals with 40–50 European and American companies. This was also the age of philanthropy and in the tradition of the family, adhering in practice to the principle of ‘wealth imposes obligation’.

The book gives details of all the schools, scholarships, public libraries, hospitals, maternal clinics, dispensaries, community centres and institutional support – like the majestic Karimjee Hall in Dar es Salaam – which bear witness to the philanthropic nature of the family philosophy (p127–146). The Raskazone Swimming Club was open to all unlike the European Yacht Clubs, thus attempting to break the racial divide that prevailed then. Yusufali Karimjee, known as the ‘Lion of Zanzibar roars’ is quoted in a press cutting, after a heated debate in the Legislative Assembly as saying to British Governor of Zanzibar, ‘If His Excellency wishes to really benefit the poor natives, we want the duty on rice and khangas reduced’. Yusufali Karimjee also believed that ‘we should not join the white men’s war’ (p55).

From 1925–1963 (p58), the author sees this as an era of movement from the trade dominated economy of the Karimjees to an estates economy. German rule in East Africa was over and the British became custodians of ‘enemy properties’ which were on sale, but only to European buyers. Through quiet diplomacy, Abdalla Mohamedali Karimjee who had married a German settler woman, managed to get six sisal estates in Tanga, feeding Tanga’s economic boom. The Korean War of 1950-53 caused a rise in the price of sisal from 18 to 250 pounds a ton. Tanganyika was the third largest producer of sisal, the white gold of Tanganyika. The Karimjees moved to a new level of entrepreneurship, employing hundreds of workers but with the same benevolence of their basic principle of obligation with wealth, thus building housing, hospitals and schools for the workers’ families.

The author sees the period of 1964–1990 as politically turbulent, and economically declining phase for the Karimjee family. He quotes the film by the Italian Gualtiero Jacopetti which witnesses the political turmoil of the isle of Zanzibar in 1964, and sees the Union with mainland in 1964, the nationalisation phase of Tanganyika and Zanzibar, the Arusha declaration of 1967, as main contributing factors to uncertainties in business community and decline in the economy of the land.

The Karimjees had to diversify into businesses that would sustain them but curtailed most of their activities. They lost all their massive properties through the nationalisation process (p161-7) Most of the family left, except for Abdulkarim Karimjee, who remained committed to the principle of the well-to-do must share their wealth and supported the first president of Tanganyika, Mwalimu Julius Nyerere in his socialist endeavours and Ujamaa policies.

It is also in this period –1968 – that the Karimjee family was excommunicated from the Dawoodi Bohra community. The spiritual leader of the community, His Holiness Seyedna, who was a frequent visitor, was asked to leave Tanzania on 14 August 1968. ‘The government of Tanganyika became seriously concerned when large amount of religious taxes were being collected from the Bohra community and exchanged for gold in order to transfer the funds to Bombay. This went against foreign exchange regulations’ of the country. According to the author, the ‘Karimjee family were blamed for this grave embarrassment’ – thus the excommunication. ‘Abdulkarim as a pious God fearing Muslim was very offended for being blamed for something he had not done and had no control over’ (p129).

The Karimjees had learnt the lesson to ‘stick to knitting’ i.e. do what they know best in times of difficulties and get by. Toyota Tanzania Ltd became their sole business, making them a locally-owned business by a global family. Only Alibhai, Anver and Hatim Karimjee remained with the management calibre to ably run the business and make it viable for the family. In 1987/8 it became the Tanzania ‘Pajero’ (p153). Sales picked up from 350 to 2,000 vehicles by 2005.

To prevent family fragmentation over time, the family established a family council and agreed to publish this particular book for the benefit primarily of the presently globally scattered family to know a shared past. In 1998 a family reunion took place in London, whereby two programmes were also established for the family. One was a three-month study tour for the younger generation to consider a career in family business in Tanzania. The second package is a two-year graduate training, whereby family members would focus on a particular profession within the family business and also learn on the job, thus keeping with the family tradition. The family council also merged six charitable trusts into a single The Karimjee Jivanjee Foundation. (p155). It is to give scholarships to gifted Tanzanian children and to other charities with the principle ‘It is not giving if you profit by the giving’ taken from Rubbaiyat of Omar Khyamm, states the author.

As a reader and living in East Africa with a diasporic background myself, the book spoke volumes on the era of migration and issues of identity. Rich in its Islamic cultural history, the author very ably brings out the tradition of benevolence of the Karimjee family, adhering to a basic principle of Islam. Although capitalist in nature, the family did business with a heart for justice, a rare commodity in today’s practices of the business communities globally.

The book is also very rich in images of the time, thus as a reader one gets a feel of the era. It abounds in visuals: Passport stamps, family portraits, images of cars and buildings, sisal production, stamps (p126) from inauguration of Karimjee Hall. However I would have liked to see more images of the numerous majestic buildings of the family, which were nationalised and some of which are still used as state buildings.

The author also goes further into the family myths and beliefs, such as women not being permitted to wear diamonds following the death of young members of the family, and no keeping of a peacock as a pet for fear that its ego will split the family union. Now when I pass Karimjee Hall in Dar es Salaam, where peacocks abound in its grounds I wonder what the ancestors must be feeling.

Although the author interviewed Fatema Karimjee and has her portrait, and women feature in photographs throughout the book, he does not bring out the contribution of women’s wisdom in the development of the family. The curiosity for us as readers is did women play any role at all or were they just passive members of family? Where are their stories?

The book is aptly dedicated to Karimjee ancestors and published for a generation who shared a past. Let us hope that this life mission of Hatim Karimjee bears fruit in the future generation of Karimjees who not only will continue to stamp their mark on the map of development of East Africa, but also maybe think of documenting the wisdom that women bring to the fold through generations of strong bondage. It is women who culturally hold the thread of not only families but also society in partnership with their male counterparts. As Nyerere once said at the birth of Umoja wa Wanawake (UWT) in Tanganyika: ‘Society will only limp if we do not count and recognize women’s contribution’. We need women’s stories within the Karimjees.

Recently, a number of writings from Asian-African perspectives have been published. For example Madhvani in ‘Tides of Fortune’ (2008), Nanjibahi Kalidas Mehta – the original was in Gujarati in 1967 later translated to English, and Sophia Mustafa’s ’The Tanganyika Way’. Then we have Awaaz magazine from Nairobi, which voices Asian–African stories and recognises their contribution in liberation movements and independence struggles through personalities like Gora Ebrahim, Karim Essak from South Africa, Makhan Singh, the trade unionist, Pinto from Kenya, Sugra Visram of Uganda, Amir Jamal and Alnoor Kassum of Tanzania, to name but a few. We also have a walking exhibition at the Nairobi Museum of how they came in dhows set up by Sultan Somji of Kenya, and the biennial SAMOSA Festival which depicts cultural fusion music, dance, paintings, publications, films and various aspect of Asian-African life in East Africa which takes place in Nairobi.



Bohra spring
Posts: 1233
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2012 8:37 am

Re: Bohras looking for help

#119

Unread post by Bohra spring » Fri Oct 25, 2013 2:05 pm

Is there record of how many Bohra youth not related to a zada have been beneficiaries of Sayedna,s charity for secular or professional academic scholarships or research grants.

I read pages and pages of how his zadas have attended western university , but that is at the dawaats expenses or their illegitimate revenue from the dawaats coffers.

I personally was declined a plea from a local Amil when I grew up and my parent told there is no scheme and the best I got was a dua, but I had a scholarship offered by a trust of departed Hindu businessman and a government scholarship, I accepted the government offer instead . In the final year of my scholarship I had a deficit and a trust in the name of a progressive came to my assistance . When later I went back to the progressive trust to repay their assistance , they politely declined ie the fund pays

Hence I always ask myself what has the dawaat ever done for me , zilch...my faith when I questioned and rejected Bohraism because the logic was irrational, was initially sourced from interacting with local community of Sunni and Shia, my education was sponsored by the government, my current livelihood is sourced from my personal hardwork doing my job, dodging instructions from the Amil to attend waaz as if he will find me another one if I risk what I have got. And on top of it I have to pay various levies and taxes to the Sayedna so I can be allowed seat and be told how I should be grateful to Sayedna Ehsan and karam.



Gulaame Islaam
Posts: 49
Joined: Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:06 pm

Re: Bohras looking for help

#120

Unread post by Gulaame Islaam » Sat Oct 26, 2013 10:43 am

Without the financial support of The Karimjee family, all the East African Bohora community would not have enjoyed the community life that we enjoyed. They provided for our education, jobs, jymkhanas, boarding house, jamatkhanas, scholarships to many of us who became lawyers and doctors and engineers and who in turn have been able to help many others after us! You name it. They were there to help whenever help was needed(with no strings attached, mind you!) Personally, I will be ever grateful to them and so will my family.