Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

Given modern distractions, the need to understand Islam better has never been more urgent. Through this forum we can share ideas and hopefully promote the true spirit of Islam which calls for peace, justice, tolerance, inclusiveness and diversity.
ghulam muhammed
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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#31

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Mon Sep 24, 2012 6:13 pm

An Open Letter To Pakistani Ladies: Is Wearing The Head-Ear-Chin Wrap Around Style Of Hijab Closer To Piety? A Probe (Ijtihad) and Soul Searching

One may wonder what kind of hypocrisy has possessed the Muslim ladies in Pakistan that of all the things expressly Islamic (charity, generosity, mercy, compassion, forgiveness, fair wages to the domestic hands, good deeds, excellence in lawful pursuits, unremitting jihad for developing once potentials, eschewing greed, arrogance and bigotry for example), they are debating today about the configuration of ‘hijab.’ Did their mothers and grandmothers ventured out in public without proper hijab? Have they suddenly become conscious of the sexual appeal of their head, ear and chin – that the present day model of medieval nun style headgear represents? Don’t they realize the very gaze (Nazar) of a woman can be far more provocative than her head, ear or neck? Have they not heard the popular Indian songs – “nazar ka teer maara jo, muhabbat usko kehten hain”; “aankho hi aankhon may ishara ho gaya” and the likes – there are hundreds of such songs. No wonder the Qur’an asks men and women to guard their gaze (Nazar in Urdu) (24:30).

Traditionally Pakistani women, as in the subcontinent, wear Quamiz, Pyjama and Dupatta to observe the hijab – that is to hide their private parts - God given constitutional charms (Zeenat) in public. Those who want to reconfigure the hijab into the medieval nun style head-ear-chin wrap-around should be free to do so while those who want to stick to their traditional Quamiz-pajama-Dupatta should carry on with their traditions. The real hijab is in the gaze (24:30) after covering the Zeenat (God given structural beauty) (24:31) and not in covering or revealing head, ear and chin or what is normally apparent of the body (maa zahara minha, 24:31).

However, those who think the medieval nun style headgear is more conducive to purity, must give up their luxurious life style which does not go with the lifestyle of the pious nuns they are trying to emulate. The modern Pakistani women in its flourishing cities live in posh houses - fully tiled or carpeted, well lit with electric lights, lamp shades, and chandeliers; often centrally air-conditioned, with all kinds of modern furnishings in all rooms, bathrooms, kitchen, lobby and what have you. They avail of numerous utilities and services from gas, electricity, telephone, cell phone, I-pad, I-pod, Internet, to insurance, modern banking and safe electronic cash. They visit beauty parlours where the attendants virtually bathe them with all kinds of exotic lotions and perfumes for their personal beautification. They shop in glittering malls, move in plush cars, go on grand vacations, throw lavish parties and enjoy all kinds of recreations and entertainments. They also avail of by far the best quality of medical services and partake of finest cuisine that no medieval nun would have ever dreamt of. In a word, the personal life of a modern Muslim lady of this era – Hijabi or non-Hijabi, Pakistani or Arab is incomparably more comfortable and luxurious than that of the medieval nun they are trying to emulate.

And if the nun-style Hijabi women think that they are emulating the nissa al bait (the women folk of the Prophet’s household) they are fooling the world or being knowingly hypocritical. Tradition tells us that in those days men and women mostly possessed only one piece of clothing with which they barely wrapped themselves around. There was such an acute scarcity of cloth that women, including those from the Prophet’s household had to use practically the same swathe of linen during their periods by sparingly and selectively rinsing off the stains [Sahih al-Bukhari, English translation by Mohsin Khan, New Delhi, 1984, Vol.1, Acc.305, 309, 348-358, 360, 361, 366]. It will be a grand mockery to lead an unimaginably more luxurious life than the azwje mutahhirin and then wear a medieval nun-style head-ear-chin overwrap to emulate them, though conceivably those pious ladies never wore such superfluous coverings.

The truth is, until the advent of Islam, women were oppressed and subjected to various forms of restrictions in practically all the major civilizations. Therefore, all the Christians (including the Romans and Greeks), Zoroastrians, pagans and Hindus who embraced Islam brought notions against women from their previous religions. This inevitably influenced their interpretation of Qur’anic exhortations on modesty. With time, this gave rise to imposition of varying restrictions upon women, including their full veiling, medieval nun style head-ear-chin over-wrap and segregation when outside the house – a custom borrowed understandably from “the Greek Christians of Byzantium, who had long veiled and segregated their women in this manner” [Karen Armstrong, Islam, A short history, New York 2002, p. 16.].

Hence, wearing a medieval nun-style head-ear-chin overwrap or simply the traditional modest dress must be left to personal choice and the external environment and dressing norms. None should claim any piety or expect any divine blessings for observing any particular style of hijab as long as they conceal their Zeenat (private parts/ God given structural beauty) and guard their glances (24:30-31).

A more elaborate discussion on the theme is presented in the following article that those who have some unanswered questions may consult for enlightenment:

Any fatwa imposing full/face veil (burqa/niqab), headscarf on Muslim women as a religious requirement is anti-Qur’anic

http://www.newageislam.com/islamic-shar ... nic/d/6073

anajmi
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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#32

Unread post by anajmi » Mon Sep 24, 2012 6:40 pm

None should claim any piety or expect any divine blessings for observing any particular style of hijab as long as they conceal their Zeenat (private parts/ God given structural beauty) and guard their glances (24:30-31).
Here is 24:30 and 31

24:30 Tell the believing men to lower their gaze and to be mindful of their chastity: this will be most con­ducive to their purity – [and,] verily, God is aware of all that they do

24:31 And tell the believing women to lower their gaze and to be mindful of their chastity, and not to display their charms [in public] beyond what may [decently] be apparent thereof; hence, let them draw their head-coverings over their bosoms. [38] And let them not display [more of] their charms to any but their husbands, or their fathers, or their husbands’ fathers, or their sons, or their husbands’ Sons, or their brothers, or their brothers’ sons, or their sisters’ sons, or their womenfolk, or those whom they rightfully possess, or such male attendants as are beyond all sexual desire, or children that are as yet unaware of women’s nakedness; and let them not swing their legs [in walking] so as to draw attention to their hidden charms And [always], O you believers - all of you - turn unto God in repentance, so that you might attain to a happy state.

Bro GM,

I would request you to first validate if what you post is true or not. Please do not get suckered into posting lies about the Quran.

ghulam muhammed
Posts: 11653
Joined: Tue Oct 07, 2008 5:34 pm

Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#33

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Tue Sep 25, 2012 6:42 pm

anajmi wrote: Bro GM,

I would request you to first validate if what you post is true or not. Please do not get suckered into posting lies about the Quran.
Bro anajmi,

The article is authored by someone else who happens to be a muslim and as you rightly said that there are bound to be some discrepancies in it but that is exactly what this forum is for as incase certain portions do not fall in line with Quran and Sunnah then we should point it out and rectify the same for readers to differentiate between truth and false as the same people may encounter the same arguments on other platforms too.

anajmi
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Joined: Wed Jan 10, 2001 5:01 am

Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#34

Unread post by anajmi » Tue Sep 25, 2012 7:41 pm

Bro GM,

If that was your intention, then you should indicate as such, when you post these articles. Do not post these articles as if you believe in them. Indicate that you have an issue and are seeking clarification regarding what is being posted.

Muslim First
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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#35

Unread post by Muslim First » Tue Sep 25, 2012 9:10 pm

Covering of Women

From Al-Islam web site
http://www.al-islam.org/a-code-of-ethic ... omen/5.htm

A) Covering for Women in the Presence of Non-Mahram Men

108 – Rule: It is wajib for women to cover their entire body from non-Mahram Men; with the exception of their face and hands, as long as the following conditions are met:

1. Their face and hands must not have any kind of beautification (zinat) on them.

1. One will not look at their face or hands with the intention of lust. AKM

Women must cover their body and hair from non-Mahram men, even if there is no harm of falling into sin and even if there is no intention of deriving pleasure. B

A woman must cover her entire body except her face and hands from non-Mahram men, with the condition that there is no zinat on these parts and that her intention is not that she wants non-Mahram men to look at these parts. However, if non-Mahram men look at her face and hands with the intention of deriving pleasure, then it is not necessary for the woman to cover her face and hands. L

According to Ihtiyat Wajib, women must also cover their face and hands from non-Mahram men. G

Women must cover the hair (on their head) and their body from non-Mahram men, with the exception of their face and hands; and if they fear that by not covering these parts they will fall into sin, or if their intention of not covering these parts is to make men look at them with a haram look, then in either of these two scenarios, it is not permitted to keep these two parts uncovered. S

A Woman must cover her entire body, with the exception of her face and hands from non-Mahram men; and in the event that there is any zinat on her face or hands, such as a ring or if she has shaped her eyebrows, or she has applied Surma to her eyes, even if these things are common among old women, it is not wajib to cover them. In other than these scenarios, a woman must cover her zinat from non-Mahram men. However, according to Ihtiyat Mustahab, a woman should cover her face and hands from a non-Mahram, even if there is no zinat on them. T

109 – Rule: According to Ihtiyat Wajib, women must cover a bit more of their face and hands than that which is normally covered. (The face is said to be that part which is wajib to wash in Wuzhu, and it is stated that the hands are the part from the wrist to the fingertips.) AKLM

According to Ihtiyat Wajib, the entire face and hands must be covered from non-Mahram men. G

According to Ihtiyat Mustahab, it is better for a woman to cover her face from non-Mahram men. T

110 – Question: According to the laws of Islam, is it allowed to expose the sole, top, malleolus and the heel of the foot, in front of non-Mahram men?

Answer: It is not allowed. ABGKLMST

Therefore: Women are not permitted to go in front of non-Mahram men without socks on their feet, or with their feet showing, go to a nearby store to buy even just one item. Also, if there are non-Mahram men in the house, then it is not permitted to come in their presence without having socks on, even if it may be one’s husband’s brother, a sister’s husband, or any other non-Mahram men.

111 – Rule: It is not permitted for women to reveal or expose the part under the chin, the neck, the ears, the chest or the forearm up to the upper arm; and therefore one must ensure that these parts are also covered from non-Mahram men. ABGKLMST

Note: Women must pay close attention to the following: In the house or in other places in which there are non-Mahram men present; if one is wearing something with short sleeves, or if one has long sleeves on and one is trying to reach to something which is high up; or taking something from the hands of a non-Mahram man; or offering fruits or other things to the non-Mahram; or when buying things from the store; or when carrying something big and heavy – in all these and other instances in which there is a chance of the sleeves going up and the arm or any part of the body becoming exposed, women must be extra cautious (to ensure that those parts which must be covered, remain covered) .

112 – Question: What is the extent of the Islamic hijab for women? For this purpose, does the wearing of clothing that is long and loose fitting, with pants and a scarf suffice? Essentially, what are the basics in the clothing and covering that a woman must observe in front of others?

Answer: It is wajib that the entire body of a woman, with the exception of the face and hands up to the wrist, is covered from non-Mahram men. The clothing that has been mentioned, if it covers that part which is wajib, then it is not a problem; but it is better to wear a chador [4].One must also refrain from that clothing which draws the attention of non-Mahram men. ABKLMST

Answer: It is wajib that the entire body of a woman is covered from non-Mahram men, and according to Ihtiyat Wajib, the face and hands must also be covered. The clothing that has been mentioned, if it covers that part which is wajib, then it is not a problem; but it is better to wear a chador. One must also refrain from that clothing which draws the attention of non-Mahram men. G

113 – Question: Is it allowed to wear a mantou [5] and pants in which the shape of the body is visible, in the presence of non-Mahram men?

Answer: From the point of hijab and covering, it is sufficient, but in the event that showing the shape of the body would lead to lust or corruption, then it must be covered. AKLMS

Answer: If it does not arouse or excite (others), and there is no corruption (in wearing it), and in the event that it is not considered as a zinat, then it is not a problem. L

Answer: In the event that it draws the attention of others (non-Mahram men), then it is not permitted. G

114 – Rule: Women are not permitted to raise their sleeves (to show their arms) to non-Mahram men in order to get an injection, have their blood pressure checked, taking of the pulse, or for any other reason, except in the case of necessity. ABGKLMST

115 – Question: I am a woman who must have an injection everyday and there is a clinic near my house in which a man gives the injections. However, there is another clinic that is further away in which a woman also gives the injection, but because it is far away, I must travel by car (to get to it). Am I allowed to go to the man to have the injection?

Answer: It is not allowed, except in the case of necessity. ABGKLMST

116 – Question: Are women allowed to go to a male doctor without investigating and inquiring if there is a female doctor available or not?

Answer: It is not allowed. AGKL

Answer: In the event that it is an emergency, it is not a problem

117 – Question: In our city, there is a female doctor and a male one, but the male doctor is more specialized and experienced. Is it allowed for women to go to the male doctor?

Answer: In the event that the female doctor can not treat the illness, then it is not a problem. ABGKLMT

Answer: In the event that the male doctor can treat the patient better

A) Covering for Women in the Presence of Non-Mahram Men

108 – Rule: It is wajib for women to cover their entire body from non-Mahram Men; with the exception of their face and hands, as long as the following conditions are met:

1. Their face and hands must not have any kind of beautification (zinat) on them.

1. One will not look at their face or hands with the intention of lust. AKM

Women must cover their body and hair from non-Mahram men, even if there is no harm of falling into sin and even if there is no intention of deriving pleasure. B

A woman must cover her entire body except her face and hands from non-Mahram men, with the condition that there is no zinat on these parts and that her intention is not that she wants non-Mahram men to look at these parts. However, if non-Mahram men look at her face and hands with the intention of deriving pleasure, then it is not necessary for the woman to cover her face and hands. L

According to Ihtiyat Wajib, women must also cover their face and hands from non-Mahram men. G

Women must cover the hair (on their head) and their body from non-Mahram men, with the exception of their face and hands; and if they fear that by not covering these parts they will fall into sin, or if their intention of not covering these parts is to make men look at them with a haram look, then in either of these two scenarios, it is not permitted to keep these two parts uncovered. S

A Woman must cover her entire body, with the exception of her face and hands from non-Mahram men; and in the event that there is any zinat on her face or hands, such as a ring or if she has shaped her eyebrows, or she has applied Surma to her eyes, even if these things are common among old women, it is not wajib to cover them. In other than these scenarios, a woman must cover her zinat from non-Mahram men. However, according to Ihtiyat Mustahab, a woman should cover her face and hands from a non-Mahram, even if there is no zinat on them. T

109 – Rule: According to Ihtiyat Wajib, women must cover a bit more of their face and hands than that which is normally covered. (The face is said to be that part which is wajib to wash in Wuzhu, and it is stated that the hands are the part from the wrist to the fingertips.) AKLM

According to Ihtiyat Wajib, the entire face and hands must be covered from non-Mahram men. G

According to Ihtiyat Mustahab, it is better for a woman to cover her face from non-Mahram men. T

110 – Question: According to the laws of Islam, is it allowed to expose the sole, top, malleolus and the heel of the foot, in front of non-Mahram men?

Answer: It is not allowed. ABGKLMST

Therefore: Women are not permitted to go in front of non-Mahram men without socks on their feet, or with their feet showing, go to a nearby store to buy even just one item. Also, if there are non-Mahram men in the house, then it is not permitted to come in their presence without having socks on, even if it may be one’s husband’s brother, a sister’s husband, or any other non-Mahram men.

111 – Rule: It is not permitted for women to reveal or expose the part under the chin, the neck, the ears, the chest or the forearm up to the upper arm; and therefore one must ensure that these parts are also covered from non-Mahram men. ABGKLMST

Note: Women must pay close attention to the following: In the house or in other places in which there are non-Mahram men present; if one is wearing something with short sleeves, or if one has long sleeves on and one is trying to reach to something which is high up; or taking something from the hands of a non-Mahram man; or offering fruits or other things to the non-Mahram; or when buying things from the store; or when carrying something big and heavy – in all these and other instances in which there is a chance of the sleeves going up and the arm or any part of the body becoming exposed, women must be extra cautious (to ensure that those parts which must be covered, remain covered) .

112 – Question: What is the extent of the Islamic hijab for women? For this purpose, does the wearing of clothing that is long and loose fitting, with pants and a scarf suffice? Essentially, what are the basics in the clothing and covering that a woman must observe in front of others?

Answer: It is wajib that the entire body of a woman, with the exception of the face and hands up to the wrist, is covered from non-Mahram men. The clothing that has been mentioned, if it covers that part which is wajib, then it is not a problem; but it is better to wear a chador [4].One must also refrain from that clothing which draws the attention of non-Mahram men. ABKLMST

Answer: It is wajib that the entire body of a woman is covered from non-Mahram men, and according to Ihtiyat Wajib, the face and hands must also be covered. The clothing that has been mentioned, if it covers that part which is wajib, then it is not a problem; but it is better to wear a chador. One must also refrain from that clothing which draws the attention of non-Mahram men. G

113 – Question: Is it allowed to wear a mantou [5] and pants in which the shape of the body is visible, in the presence of non-Mahram men?

Answer: From the point of hijab and covering, it is sufficient, but in the event that showing the shape of the body would lead to lust or corruption, then it must be covered. AKLMS

Answer: If it does not arouse or excite (others), and there is no corruption (in wearing it), and in the event that it is not considered as a zinat, then it is not a problem. L

Answer: In the event that it draws the attention of others (non-Mahram men), then it is not permitted. G

114 – Rule: Women are not permitted to raise their sleeves (to show their arms) to non-Mahram men in order to get an injection, have their blood pressure checked, taking of the pulse, or for any other reason, except in the case of necessity. ABGKLMST

115 – Question: I am a woman who must have an injection everyday and there is a clinic near my house in which a man gives the injections. However, there is another clinic that is further away in which a woman also gives the injection, but because it is far away, I must travel by car (to get to it). Am I allowed to go to the man to have the injection?

Answer: It is not allowed, except in the case of necessity. ABGKLMST

116 – Question: Are women allowed to go to a male doctor without investigating and inquiring if there is a female doctor available or not?

Answer: It is not allowed. AGKL

Answer: In the event that it is an emergency, it is not a problem

117 – Question: In our city, there is a female doctor and a male one, but the male doctor is more specialized and experienced. Is it allowed for women to go to the male doctor?

Answer: In the event that the female doctor can not treat the illness, then it is not a problem. ABGKLMT

Answer: In the event that the male doctor can treat the patient better, then it is not a problem. S

Muslim First
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Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2001 4:01 am

Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#36

Unread post by Muslim First » Tue Oct 02, 2012 5:53 am

Asked by her host about why she is wearing a hijab while many Muslim women don’t wear it, and don’t find it to be a religious obligation, she answered: “I see it as a divine order or a divine advice, this brings joy to my heart and for me this is enough.
Quote by
Mélanie Georgiades, a popular rapper in France where hijab - the Islamic veil is banned by the state
http://www.islamicity.com/m/news_frame. ... ceID=67226

Actually Niqaab is banned not Hijab

ghulam muhammed
Posts: 11653
Joined: Tue Oct 07, 2008 5:34 pm

Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#37

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Sat Jul 13, 2013 4:11 pm

But the question is: Does facial exposure constitute such a big threat to Muslim women and their religious rights that they should expend so much time and energy debating this issue? The truth is that most Muslims are unaware of the fact that the word “burqa” is not part of the Koran's sartorial terminology. The terms used by the Koran are jilbaab, an outer wrapping garment which is to be worn around the body (33:59), and khimaar, a kind of covering for the head and the bosom (24:31). It may be noted here that jilbaab and khimaar denote just modest clothing and not a head-to-toe shroud like the burqa with just a small opening for the eyes. Had this been the case, the Koranic instruction to Muslim men to “lower their gaze” (24:30-31) would have made no sense. For how could a fully shrouded woman be gazed at? And what does one say of hadith in Bukhari which asks women not to cover their faces during Haj?

Another word that is equated with the burqa is hijaab. It occurs eight times in the Koran (7:46, 17:45, 19:17, 33:53, 38:32, 41:5, 42:51 and 83:15) but interestingly, not once in the traditional meaning of burqa as understood by Muslims today. Hijaab actually refers to an imaginary or real barrier between people or things. For instance, verse 17:45 talks of a hidden barrier (hijaaban mastoora) between the non-believers and the Prophet, and verse 33:53 teaches social etiquette to the not-so-literate Arab guests of the Prophet by instructing them not to confront the women of his household directly for their requirements but to talk to them from behind a curtain (min waraayi hijaab) as a mark of respect.

Why then this insistence on the full veil in some Muslim societies? The answer lies in the fact that some of the widely read translations of the Koran are not exactly honest on this issue. For example, in The Noble Quran, an English translation authorised by Saudi Arabia, a perusal of 24:31 would reveal that an attempt has been made to introduce, without any basis, an extra-Koranic meaning to the following text concerning the dress code; walaa yubdeena zeenatahunna illa ma zahara minha wal yazribna bi khumurihinna ala juyoobihinna. The Noble Quran translates this as: “[Tell the believing women]…not to show off their adornment except only that which is apparent [like both eyes for necessity to see the way, or outer palms of hands or one eye or dress like veil, gloves, head cover, apron], and to draw their veils all over juyoobihinna [i.e. their bodies, faces, necks and bosoms].”

The meaning that is sought to be conveyed in the parentheses is a clear addition to what is contained in the Arabic text wherein “khumurihinna ala juyoobihinna” only means “to put a covering over the bosoms” and not the face. The translators of The Noble Quran have also tried to support their views by mistranslating a hadith from the Bukhari which quotes Hazrath Aisha as saying that when verse 24:31 was revealed women tore off pieces from their waist sheets (murooth) to use them as a covering for their “heads and faces.” Once again, the words “heads and faces” are not found in the original hadith text, shaqqaqna muroothahunna faqtamarna biha, which means “they tore off the murooths to cover themselves up.”

The aforementioned facts coupled with the Prophetic saying (in Abu Dawood) advising women not to reveal any part of their bodies “except the face and the palms” clearly prove that neither the Koran nor the hadith forces a woman to conceal her face. Muslim women, therefore, need not worry over a French ban on the burqa because wearing a niqab minus the face veil does in no way violate the Koran or the Prophet's teachings.

http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/m ... 525467.ece

ghulam muhammed
Posts: 11653
Joined: Tue Oct 07, 2008 5:34 pm

Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#38

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Thu Oct 24, 2013 4:02 pm

Why I wear a hijab

The hijab is seen as a tool of oppression. Why doesn’t anyone ask the women who choose to wear it, wonders Nisha Susan

A new generation of Muslim women are a challenge to old notions of the hijab as merely a coercive tool of male imprisonment. For them, it is an intensely personal and voluntary act. Yet, instead of asking for their opinions, hijab wars are now raging across the world on their behalf — from France, where zealous liberals have banned it, to Mangalore, where zealous bigots want to ban it.

Over years of introspection and reading, these women have arrived at an understanding of the hijab as an attitude of modesty they are comfortable adopting. Their choices may seem inhibiting, but it is voluntary. They understand personal freedom not merely as the right to wear less, but to wear what they please — in this case, the right to wear more. Can one deny them this right?

Yet, not everything they say is easy to hear. The Quran tells you to be modest, not to wear purdah, says a hijabi. It tells you to cover your hair, ears and lower your gaze, says another. A third says the hijab prevents rapes; when she uses Old Testament words like ‘carnal attention’, you sweat a little. The saviour of Muslim womanhood inevitably sees new windmills to tilt at.

But why should this garment offend, ask these hijabis. For many of the Indian women who began wearing it post 9/11 – in the wake of the sweeping hostility against Muslims that enveloped even India — the prying gaze is not behind the twitching curtains of neighbours. It is a panopticon. And it is the hostility that turned many women — doctors, artists, writers — to the Quran for answers. Did Islam really tell a 17-year-old to bomb a building? Instead these women came away with an understanding of Islam as a compassionate, well-ordered way of life and with a decision to wear the hijab.

Almost universally, they speak of this decision as hugely empowering. Liberating.

The new hijabi sees consumerism and its coercive, insidious culture of the body as an imprisonment. The hijab represents a freedom from that. Farah Saleem, 24, a psychology student and daughter of NRI parents, says, “Now people don’t judge me on whether I’m wearing the jewellery I wore yesterday.” In a world devoted to the careful curating of consumption and appearances, such decisions ask us to make our fixed notions of “freedom” wider and more accommodative.

Muslim women are constantly asked to prove they are not slaves, so no statistics will end the worry that the new hijabis too have been brainwashed. Nudged about this, Tabassum lapses into passion. “Sometimes even close friends ask about ‘pressure’. I tell them: Think of how joyfully you ask your mother to put a teeka on your forehead. You’ve to believe that I have a mind.”

Film critic Roger Ebert once said that some melodramatic films depend on every character being an idiot, not telling each other the necessary truth. In our old country with new problems, we may never understand each other. We may feel stuck in an idiot plot but it does not have to lead to paranoia.

Read More :-

http://www.tehelka.com/why-i-wear-a-hijab/

ghulam muhammed
Posts: 11653
Joined: Tue Oct 07, 2008 5:34 pm

Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#39

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Fri Dec 20, 2013 6:14 pm

How I Came To Love The Veil

Yvonne Ridley, Washington post - London, USA

I used to look at veiled women as quiet, oppressed creatures -- until I was captured by the Taliban.

In September 2001, just 15 days after the terrorist attacks on the United States , I snuck into Afghanistan , clad in a head-to-toe blue burqa, intending to write a newspaper account of life under the repressive regime. Instead, I was discovered, arrested and detained for 10 days. I spat and swore at my captors; they called me a "bad" woman but let me go after I promised to read the Koran and study Islam. (Frankly, I'm not sure who was happier when I was freed -- they or I.)

Back home in London , I kept my word about studying Islam -- and was amazed by what I discovered. I'd been expecting Koran chapters on how to beat your wife and oppress your daughters; instead, I found passages promoting the liberation of women. Two-and-a-half years after my capture, I converted to Islam, provoking a mixture of astonishment, disappointment and encouragement among friends and relatives.

Now, it is with disgust and dismay that I watch here in Britain as former foreign secretary Jack Straw describes the Muslim nikab -- a face veil that reveals only the eyes -- as an unwelcome barrier to integration, with Prime Minister Tony Blair, writer Salman Rushdie and even Italian Prime Minister Romano Prodi leaping to his defense.

Having been on both sides of the veil, I can tell you that most Western male politicians and journalists who lament the oppression of women in the Islamic world have no idea what they are talking about. They go on about veils, child brides, female circumcision, honor killings and forced marriages, and they wrongly blame Islam for all this -- their arrogance surpassed only by their ignorance.

These cultural issues and customs have nothing to do with Islam. A careful reading of the Koran shows that just about everything that Western feminists fought for in the 1970s was available to Muslim women 1,400 years ago. Women in Islam are considered equal to men in spirituality, education and worth, and a woman's gift for childbirth and child-rearing is regarded as a positive attribute.

When Islam offers women so much, why are Western men so obsessed with Muslim women's attire? Even British government ministers Gordon Brown and John Reid have made disparaging remarks about the nikab -- and they hail from across the Scottish border, where men wear skirts.

When I converted to Islam and began wearing a headscarf, the repercussions were enormous. All I did was cover my head and hair -- but I instantly became a second-class citizen. I knew I'd hear from the odd Islamophobe, but I didn't expect so much open hostility from strangers. Cabs passed me by at night, their "for hire" lights glowing. One cabbie, after dropping off a white passenger right in front of me, glared at me when I rapped on his window, then drove off. Another said, "Don't leave a bomb in the back seat" and asked, "Where's bin Laden hiding?"

Yes, it is a religious obligation for Muslim women to dress modestly, but the majority of Muslim women I know like wearing the hijab, which leaves the face uncovered, though a few prefer the nikab. It is a personal statement: My dress tells you that I am a Muslim and that I expect to be treated respectfully, much as a Wall Street banker would say that a business suit defines him as an executive to be taken seriously. And, especially among converts to the faith like me, the attention of men who confront women with inappropriate, leering behavior is not tolerable.

I was a Western feminist for many years, but I've discovered that Muslim feminists are more radical than their secular counterparts. We hate those ghastly beauty pageants, and tried to stop laughing in 2003 when judges of the Miss Earth competition hailed the emergence of a bikini-clad Miss Afghanistan , Vida Samadzai, as a giant leap for women's liberation. They even gave Samadzai a special award for "representing the victory of women's rights."


Some young Muslim feminists consider the hijab and the nikab political symbols, too, a way of rejecting Western excesses such as binge drinking, casual sex and drug use. What is more liberating: being judged on the length of your skirt and the size of your surgically enhanced breasts, or being judged on your character and intelligence? In Islam, superiority is achieved through piety -- not beauty, wealth, power, position or sex.

I didn't know whether to scream or laugh when Italy's Prodi joined the debate last week by declaring that it is "common sense" not to wear the nikab because it makes social relations "more difficult." Nonsense. If this is the case, then why are cellphones, landlines, e-mail, text messaging and fax machines in daily use? And no one switches off the radio because they can't see the presenter's face.

Under Islam, I am respected. It tells me that I have a right to an education and that it is my duty to seek out knowledge, regardless of whether I am single or married. Nowhere in the framework of Islam are we told that women must wash, clean or cook for men. As for how Muslim men are allowed to beat their wives -- it's simply not true. Critics of Islam will quote random Koranic verses or hadith, but usually out of context. If a man does raise a finger against his wife, he is not allowed to leave a mark on her body, which is the Koran's way of saying, "Don't beat your wife, stupid."

It is not just Muslim men who must reevaluate the place and treatment of women. According to a recent National Domestic Violence Hotline survey, 4 million American women experience a serious assault by a partner during an average 12-month period. More than three women are killed by their husbands and boyfriends every day -- that is nearly 5,500 since 9/11.

Violent men don't come from any particular religious or cultural category; one in three women around the world has been beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused in her lifetime, according to the hotline survey. This is a global problem that transcends religion, wealth, class, race and culture.

But it is also true that in the West, men still believe that they are superior to women, despite protests to the contrary. They still receive better pay for equal work -- whether in the mailroom or the boardroom -- and women are still treated as sexualized commodities whose power and influence flow directly from their appearance.

hermosh@aol. com

Yvonne Ridley is political editor of Islam Channel TV in London and coauthor of "In the Hands of the Taliban: Her Extraordinary Story" (Robson Books).

ghulam muhammed
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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#40

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Thu Jun 05, 2014 5:16 pm

Iranian women discard their hijabs for 'stealthy freedom' Facebook page

Women in Iran have been posting pictures of themselves after 'stealthily' taking their hijabs off in public, in a country where it is illegal for a female to leave the house without wearing a headscarf under Islamic law.

Over 150 photos have been posted to the Stealthy Freedoms of Iranian Women Facebook page which has amassed more than 140,000 likes since it was created just a week ago by the Iranian journalist Masih Alinejad.
The image was captioned with: “Hijab is being forced on women not only by the Morality Police, but also out of consideration for family, through wanting to keep a job and because of fear of judgment from others."

"I wrote that I had experienced all of these pressures too," she explained. "I was sure that most Iranian women who don’t believe in the forced hijab have enjoyed freedom in secret, [so] I asked them if they wished to share this moment of stealth freedom."

The response she received shortly after starting the page was "staggering", something she feels "delighted" at, but not surprised by.

The site is dedicated to Iranian women inside the country "who want to share their 'stealthily' taken photos without the veil".

Ms Alinejad said: "It is a basic right for any person to have freedom of choice. Women in Iran, along with many other countries, want to choose what they wear. It should not be legislated nor should it be enforced."

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world ... 61388.html

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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#41

Unread post by anajmi » Fri Jun 06, 2014 4:24 pm

I think the women deserve even more freedom. They should discard their clothes completely.

ghulam muhammed
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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#42

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Thu Jul 03, 2014 5:50 pm

French veil ban on Muslim face covers upheld by European court

French veil ban: Since 2011, France has banned women from hiding their face in public. France has the largest Muslim population in Western Europe, but a court ruled that the veil ban is a legitimate bid to promote harmony in a diverse population.

Paris — The European Court of Human Rights on Tuesday upheld France's law banning face-covering Muslim veils from the streets, in a case brought by a woman who claimed her freedom of religion was violated.

The ruling by the Strasbourg-based court was the first of its kind since France passed a law in 2010 that forbids anyone to hide his or her face in an array of places, including the street. The law went into effect in 2011.

The court's Grand Chamber rejected the arguments of the French woman in her mid-20s, a practicing Muslim not identified by name. She said she doesn't hide her face at all times, but when she does it is to be at peace with her faith, her culture and convictions. She stressed in her complaint that no one, including her husband, forced her to conceal her face — something of particular concern to French authorities.

The court ruled that the law's bid to promote harmony in a diverse population is legitimate and doesn't breach the European Convention on Human Rights.

Critics of the ban, including human rights defenders, contend the law targets Muslims and stigmatizes Islam. France has the largest Muslim population in Western Europe, estimated at five million, making the issue particularly sensitive.

Under the law, women who cover their faces can be fined up to 150 euros ($205) or be obliged to attend a citizenship class, or both.

When enacted, the law was seen as a security measure, with veiled women considered fundamentalists and potential candidates for extremist views. Another concern was respect for the French model of integration in which people of different origins are expected to assimilate.

The court concluded the ban is a "choice of society," giving France a wide margin of appreciation — all the more so because there is no common ground in Europe on the issue. Only a minority of countries ban face veils.

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Latest-N ... t?cmpid=TW

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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#43

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Tue Jul 08, 2014 5:27 pm

Jewish Discourses on Veiling

Veiling is important in Judaism, as it is in Christianity and Islam. The veiling of women’s hair is part of Jewish laws on modesty (Hebr. tzniuth). A woman’s hair is considered ervah, or erotic stimulus, which must therefore be covered just as other ervah parts of a woman’s body must also be covered.

The proper coverage of Hasidic women and the manner of their dress is explicitly detailed and regulated by the laws of the Torah, or halakhoth.

Here are the clothing prescriptions for the Torah-observant Jewish woman (according to Rav Yitzchak Yaacov Fuchs, in A Woman’s Guide to Jewish Observance):

This information on clothing regulation of Jewish women is taken from Barbara Goldman Carrell, “Shattered Vessels that Contain Divine Sparks; Unveiling Hasidic Women’s Dress Code,” in The Veil: Women Writers on its History, Lore and Politics, ed. Jennifer Heath (University of California Press, 2008):

“The law requires that the neck (below and including the collarbone), the upper arms (including the elbow) and the thighs and knees (when sitting or standing) of a married woman’s be covered both in public and within the confines of her own house.” (p. 48)

In addition, Jewish law also requires that “a married woman may not appear in public with her hair uncovered. She is required to wear a head-covering that hides all her hair from view. It is proper to ensure that no hair protrudes from it.” (pp. 48-49)

Veiling in Judaism marks both Torah-observant women from others, and married from unmarried women.

Today, orthodox Jewish and Hasidic women dress modestly and practice veiling as a visible reflection of their observance of the laws of the Torah and in order to fulfill her obligation to serve as “redeemer of the Jewish people.”

Ways of veiling in Judaism

There are different ways of veiling, depending on a woman’s strict adherence to Jewish Laws.

Some Hasidic women shave their heads entirely on the day after their weddings, and repeat the shaving monthly to ensure that not a single strand of hair would ever be allowed to show. This is the tradition observed by Hasidic women in Hungary, the Ukraine and Galicia.

Other Jewish women wear a scarf (tikhl) over their hair.

Others still wear a wig (sheytl) in order to cover up their real hair. This form of covering is considered less religious than the scarf because of the appearance of hair.

Some may (or may not) shave their hair underneath the scarf or wig.

Shaving the hair and then covering it with a scarf is considered to be practiced by the most zealous Hasidic women.

Jewish veiling and fashion

Most Hasidic women veil, even as they observe fashion and color coordination. Many have more than one wig and an assortment of hats and scarves in order to match whichever outfit they may be wearing.

http://veil.unc.edu/religions/judaism/

ghulam muhammed
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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#44

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Thu Jul 24, 2014 3:48 pm

AN OPEN LETTER TO WESTERN MEDIA

FROM AN ANGRY MUSLIM WOMAN


There are journalists who report the truth and even risk their lives in doing so. Some have been imprisoned and some have even been killed for just telling the truth. Their lives had been taken because they believed in free speech. They stood for the oppressed and stood against injuctice. To them is my utmost respect. They are amongst the heroes of the world today.

However there are also many journalists who are nothing but scaremongers, and they wouldn’t report the truth even if it hits them in the face. They don’t represent the voice of the people, they represent the voice of the government and the elites. They are nothing but puppets to those who wish to destroy the world we live in today. To them I write this open letter.

Dear Sir / Madam

For over a decade you have demonised me and my religion. You have spoken for me, and said that I am oppressed, but you never truly want to listen to what I have to say.

I don’t wear wear the niqab (face veil), and you still can’t see my face. You can’t see my body language, but I know you can understand me clearly. Let me say this clearly, what Muslim women wear, is none of your business. If it scares you or makes you feel uncomfortable then I suggest you look the other way, look down or look up, but know that we don’t dress to please you. You are insignificant to us, and we think you should keep your backwards opinions to yourself. Yes it is backwards to be intolerant of the beliefs of others. It is backwards to think that the European way of life is superior to the way of life of others.

Learn from history and know that in early Islam, women were business women, ministers, scholars and warriors who fought men on the battlefields. Learn from history that only as far back as 150 years ago in Europe, the ‘intellectual’ men amongst you were having a debate to decide whether women have souls or not, and whether a woman could even be classified as a human being. Yes you have come far, and thank God that you did. However this does not make you superior, it just makes you more clever than what you were 150 years ago.

READ FULL ARTICLE :-

https://medium.com/@Saira1Ummah/an-open ... 1fd951f9c6

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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#45

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Sun Dec 28, 2014 5:03 pm

From Bollywood to Islam: the story of Murcyleen Peerzada

She used to spend her days getting dolled up with the best of branded, glamorous outfits and makeup. Shopping in the expensive malls was her biggest passion. For this shopaholic (as she would call herself), Dubai was the most preferred shopping destination. But that was till 2012.

Born and brought up in Mumbai, house to India’s film industry, Murcyleen Peerzada, 23, worked as an assistant director for ‘Ek Tha Tiger’ while still in the last year of her college. Her father, Feroz Peerzada, a wealthy Kashmiri businessman who had known Yash Chopra for three decades, introduced her to the famous film director.

And her aim was to make it big at the silver screen.

But her life is a complete reverse to what it used to be.

Murcyleen, still based in Mumbai, has donated all her expensive outfits, branded accessories, and makeup to the orphanages to lead a simple and modest life. The dramatic turn over came with the death of the film director who was known for making romantic movies.

“I was very close to Yash Ji (Yash Chopra). His death shook me entirely, and I started thinking about life and the higher power that controls everything. I went into depression for three or four months. I used to do nothing,” Murcyleen told Kashmir Reader on phone from Mumbai.

“While looking for an answer on internet, I came across the videos of world renowned Islamic speakers like Nouman Ali Khan and Yasmin Mogahed,” she said.

“When I heard Khan for the first time, I was like ‘Oh My God! He is talking to me only’. I was a Muslim just by name, not by practice. But the knowledge I attained from Khan and Mogahed was awakening. That was the point of life where I started praying twice a day. And I used to ask Allah to guide me and show me the right path,” she said.

Murcyleen is now an Islamic orator with Zakir Naik’s Islamic Research Foundation (IRF) in Mumbai. Recently, she conducted a first-of-its-kind all-women Islamic Peace Conference here.

“I was 19 when I started working for Yash Raj Films (YRF) as an assistant director for ‘Ek Tha Tiger’. I took it as a stepping stone as my goal was to become an actor,” she said about her journey from Bollywood to Islam.

In her next film for YRF, ‘Shudh Desi Romance’, Murcyleen was offered a screen-test.

“The director of the movie is known to launch new faces, so he offered me a screen test. When I faced the camera, I don’t know what happened to me and I suddenly felt very exposed and vulnerable. I felt like an object with all eyes on me. I couldn’t take it, and I walked out saying ‘I don’t want to do this ever’,” she said.

“Yash Chopra was like a grandfather to me. When I told him about my decision, we talked about it for more than an hour. Then I decided that I will do costume, and Yash Ji recommended me to Manish Malhotra,” she said.

Murcyleen hadn’t joined Malhotra when the turning point in her life (Chopra’s death) came in her life October 2012.

While browsing internet for Islamic knowledge, she, while cleaning her house, found a pile of files with Allah written on the topmost one.

“It was transcript of a video of Zakir Naik on the topic ‘Women in Islam’. It instantly gripped me as if I found the purpose of my life. It was so enlightening that I read the whole bunch by the evening,” she said.
That very evening, she decided the future course of her life and got herself enrolled in IRF to learn about Islam under the guidance of Farah Naik, wife of Zakir Naik.

“People find Islam very strict, but I found it more liberal. During my initial months at IRF, I did not cover my head, and nobody would force me to do it. In fact, my colleagues would think that I was a revert to Islam.

“It was only after I myself understood the importance of hijab for a woman that I started covering my head. I am glad about my transformation and I want more and more people to turn towards Allah because that is the only truth,” she said.

Murcyleen is currently doing an advanced course in order to become an IRF orator. Besides, she is doing her Masters in Islamic Studies from the Islamic Online University in Qatar through correspondence. She intends to organize more Islamic conferences for women in Kashmir in near future.

“I found that Kashmiri women are more attracted to Westernisation. They are where I was some years ago. I know how exactly they feel. My generation cannot be inspired with angry speeches. Therefore, I want to connect with youth through more peace conferences where scholars talk at length about various things in a subtle way,” she added.

http://www.islamicity.com/m/news_frame. ... ceID=81682

ghulam muhammed
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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#46

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Fri Feb 27, 2015 4:41 pm

‘You are not suitably dressed': Quebec judge refused to hear single mother’s case because of hijab

Montreal — A Quebec Court judge refused to hear the case this week of a single mother trying to retrieve her car because the woman would not remove her Muslim head scarf.

“In my opinion, you are not suitably dressed,” Judge Eliana Marengo told Rania El-Alloul Tuesday, according to a courtroom recording obtained by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp.

“Decorum is important. Hats and sunglasses, for example, are not allowed, and I don’t see why scarves on the head would be. The same rules need to be applied to everyone.”

Ms. El-Alloul testified she was on welfare and the mother of three sons. She was trying to get back her car, which had been seized by the provincial automobile insurance board after one of her sons was caught driving it with a suspended licence.

She told the judge she needed the car to provide for her family. “I’m facing money problems,” she said.

But Judge Marengo refused to hear the merits of the case, citing a regulation governing court decorum that states simply, “Any person appearing before the court must be suitably dressed.”

Sameer Zuberi, a law graduate and board member with the Canadian Muslim Forum, said this is the first case he is aware of where a woman has been ordered to remove a hijab, which leaves the face exposed.

http://news.nationalpost.com/2015/02/26 ... jab-judge/

ghulam muhammed
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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#47

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Sun Mar 01, 2015 6:16 pm

When Your Religion Makes You Too Uncool to Work at Abercrombie

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court heard arguments about discrimination against job applicants who wear headscarves. But the case reveals something deeper about who's considered attractive in America

http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/arc ... ie/386114/

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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#48

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Thu Mar 12, 2015 6:45 pm

Stephen Harper’s ‘anti-woman’ niqab comment mocked on Twitter with #DressCodePM hashtag

On Tuesday, Prime Minister Stephen Harper doubled down on his opposition to wearing face veils, this time extending his views beyond what is or is not appropriate at citizenship ceremonies.

“It’s very easy to understand,” said Harper in the House of Commons. “Why would Canadians, contrary to our own values, embrace a practice at that time that is not transparent, that is not open and, frankly, is rooted in a culture that is anti-women?”

He also said “almost all Canadians oppose the wearing of face coverings during citizenship ceremonies.”

Well, as some Twitter users are pointing out, many Canadians disagree. Using the hashtag #DressCodePM, women are asking Harper to clarify whether their own clothing and accessory choices are PM-approved.

http://news.nationalpost.com/2015/03/11 ... m-hashtag/

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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#49

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Sat Mar 14, 2015 6:15 pm

Muslim Teachers May Wear Head Scarves, German Court Rules

BERLIN — The Federal Constitutional Court ruled on Friday that female Muslim teachers may wear head scarves in school.

The 6-to-2 ruling from the court in Karlsruhe stipulated that teachers may wear the head scarf so long as it does not cause disruption in the school.

The decision comes amid growing tensions throughout Europe over the absorption of thousands of Syrian refugees and other Muslims, stoking nationalism in many parts of the continent.

Several politicians and legal experts welcomed the ruling as an advance for religious and individual freedom. Leaders of Germany’s estimated 3.5 million Muslims noted that Muslim women who had previously declined to train as teachers for fear they would not be able to wear the head scarf in school would now be encouraged to do so.

But teachers and school principals could face a challenge. Some news media commentators also worried that the ruling would fan anti-immigrant sentiment and perhaps lend new support to Pegida, an anti-Islam protest movement that started in Dresden and argues that Europe is being “Islamized.”

Concerns about Muslims and their influence are common across Europe, which is now home to an estimated 18 million Muslims, out of a total population of about 500 million.

The ruling leaves Germany in stark contrast to France, where a law bans conspicuous religious symbols, including Islamic head scarves, in state schools.

An 11-page statement from the court summarizing the ruling also specified that state schools should promote religious tolerance, and that permitting the wearing of a Jewish kippa, a nun’s habit or symbols like a cross is part of that tolerance.

By contrast, the ban on crosses, crucifixes or other religious symbols on the walls of state schools stands, the court ruled. “A cross or crucifix on the wall is something different,” Professor Pestalozza said. “If you put it up on the wall, then that is not an individual act by a teacher. It is the school, and by extension in effect the state.”

Concerns about Muslims and their influence are common across Europe, which is now home to an estimated 18 million Muslims, out of a total population of about 500 million.

The ruling leaves Germany in stark contrast to France, where a law bans conspicuous religious symbols, including Islamic head scarves, in state schools.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/14/world ... il0=y&_r=1

qutub_mamajiwala
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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#50

Unread post by qutub_mamajiwala » Sat Apr 25, 2015 8:02 am

http://news.kuwaittimes.net/will-the-an ... n-succeed/

Egyptian journalist Sharif Al-Shwashi has launched a campaign called “Remove your Hijab”, which has provoked considerable debate in newspapers and on television and social media between supporters and opponents. His provocative call for taking off the hijab in Egypt was highly controversial not only in Egypt, but also in the Gulf.

The journalist made an open invitation to all women wearing headscarves to gather in Tahrir Square in the heart of the Egyptian capital in early May to take off their headscarves in public. He said the objective is to confront “extremist ideology”, but opponents counter that this call contradicts the freedom of dress. Shwashi also justified his call by saying that “seven out of every 10 women wear headscarves either due to fear or threats from family members”. The liberals were pleased by the call and were its first supporters.

They consider the hijab a symbol of backwardness and think Egypt was better “without the veil”, a reference to the ‘50s, ‘60s and ‘70s when the hijab was not widespread. Tweeters were split on when the hijab appeared in the Egyptian society and whether it is a religious duty or a cultural dress that entered Egypt because of Egyptian workers who live in the Gulf states. The hair cover has been part of the traditional women’s dress among the people of the Gulf throughout history. In Kuwait, specifically in the ‘50s, ‘60s and ‘70s, women used to put on a black abaya when leaving the house, and the hair was covered by the abaya too, so some may be right when they claim that the hair cover is part of the traditions of the people of the Gulf.

The journalist has the right to express his opinion, but to call for a public gathering to take off the hijab in an Islamic country is illogical, racist and outrageous, especially when he said that “99 percent of prostitutes wear the hijab”, a statement that sparked widespread condemnation. His call is no different from typical religious calls in favor of the hijab, as women are expected to move on the path that is drawn by men without any freedom of choice.

The problem in the Arab world is that women are not seen as independent figures or even full humans with a mind and brain, but followers who should obey. I totally agree that some women may have been forced to wear the hijab or accept arranged marriages against their will, but how many of them filed a complaint against their parents or husband? Everyone is entitled to promote any idea to take off the veil or niqab, but this call seems inappropriate at a time when Egypt is witnessing instability, unrest and difficult economic conditions. If someone doesn’t like a certain dress code, he/she must think twice that this could be his/her personal choice. I feel the same way against the niqab, but if a country’s law allows women to wear it, then I must respect it.

Egypt is an Islamic country and if the laws approve it, then it should be no one’s business to object. France, for example, bans the veil, and so be it - it is their country and their laws. Many people have rejected Shwashi’s call, accusing him of trying to change the cultural identity of the Egyptian society, and set up several hashtags on social media. Time will tell if this campaign will succeed or not. It surely attracted public attention, but how many will heed this journalist’s call?

http://news.kuwaittimes.net/will-the-an ... n-succeed/

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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#51

Unread post by Muslim First » Wed May 20, 2015 9:02 am

Hijab: Fard (Obligation) or Fiction?
by Lobna MullaOctober 15, 2012
http://www.virtualmosque.com/ummah/wome ... r-fiction/

KA786110
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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#52

Unread post by KA786110 » Wed May 20, 2015 10:53 pm

A very fine article by Farida Majid. Modesty in clothing is the best and Islamic. Dupatta used in the subcontinent and Chaddor used in Iran are preferable but again it is the choice of the woman. Hijab especially Burqa are like imprisonment of women. Have you seen the burqa used in some areas, those are mobile prison cells and a security risk for the society you never know who is behind the covering (Remember the mullah from the red mosque trying to flee wearing a burqa)

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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#53

Unread post by ghulam muhammed » Thu May 21, 2015 5:19 pm

KA786110 wrote:Remember the mullah from the red mosque trying to flee wearing a burqa
Even Baba Ramdev tried to flee the Ramlila Maidan during Anna Hazare's movement BUT he tried to flee in a salwar/kameez and not hijab :lol: :lol:

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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#54

Unread post by KA786110 » Thu May 21, 2015 6:08 pm

Baba should have tired the 'birthday suit'. Might have had better success. :) :)

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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#55

Unread post by KA786110 » Mon Jun 01, 2015 8:54 am

humanbeing wrote:Bro QM

you could have used example of a simple dress code such as jeans and top, salwar kameez, office formals etc to exert your POV. beyond the bikin example I relate your point.

Anajmi, you are smarter to understand QM's point but rigid to acknowledge to defend your idea of moedsty lies only in hijaab niqaab burqa type of dresses.you are entitled to your POV and so does QM, or anyone women or men.

Women wearing decent office formals or social casuals or any such other dress code either by fashion or culture shall be fine. There is nothing islamic about burqa, hijaab or niqaab. i consider them cultural rather than religious.
That is rational Islamic thinking but Salafi/Wahabi fundamentalists will not understand it. To them accepting Islam means adopting backwards, misogynist, inhumane and anachronistic current Saudi Arabian culture.

SBM
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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#56

Unread post by SBM » Mon Jun 01, 2015 11:07 am

Maulana Fazlur Rehman calls for military operation against jeans-wearing women

Maulana Fazlur Rehman calls for military operation against jeans-wearing women
‘Pakistan’s sovereignty and the security of the citizens are at stake’
Islamabad: Jamiat Ulema-e-Islami Fazl (JUI-F) Chief Maulana Fazlur Rehman following the Friday sermon requested the armed forces of Pakistan to launch a military operation against “jeans-wearing women” all over Pakistan in a press conference at a local hotel in Islamabad. Fazlur Rehman while highlighting the demerits of an operation against the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) said that the Taliban were not Pakistan’s enemy and the forces needed to target the real enemies of Pakistan.
“The Taliban are our brothers and their angst against the state is justified,” Fazl said adding that, “As brother Ansar Abbasi has so eloquently put in the past: TTP’s suicide bombings are just Allah’s wrath upon us. And so there is a need to earmark and eliminate the real enemy of Pakistan: every woman who wears jeans.”
When asked how jeans-wearing women were enemies of the state the JUI-F chief retorted angrily. “From earthquakes to inflation all kinds of disasters are caused by the immodesty of women. A woman that is not covered like a sack of flour is a walking and talking weapon of mass destruction for her state. And Pakistan has a multitude of such nuclear missiles in all its major cities,” Fazl said, now fuming like a steam engine.
Fazl then went on to lay the blame of the Balochistan crisis, energy shortfall and the deteriorating security situation upon the “immodest women” as well.
“If you wrap up these women in sacks and keep them stored in your houses, do you think the Taliban brothers would attack Pakistan? That’s what they want, Shariah left, right and centre and women inside houses living in their sacks. And once Allah stops delivering His wrath via the Taliban the economy would automatically improve through foreign investment, which in turn would improve the energy situation. Every problem’s solution lies in taking care of the women.”
Fazl then openly requested the two Sharifs – the army chief and the prime minister – to openly declare war against Pakistani women and launch a military operation.
“Pakistan’s sovereignty and the security of the citizens are at stake. And when that’s the case the only logical approach of the state should be to launch a military operation,” concluded Fazl.

JavedhJuma
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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#57

Unread post by JavedhJuma » Mon Jun 01, 2015 2:26 pm

My dear brothers,

This problem is not only in Modi's world, but around the world. However, in the West we have Court systems that are fair no matter what outsiders say.

Please read: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/02/us/su ... .html?_r=0

Bravo sister! Wish others would have the same kind of strong spine!

KA786110
Posts: 360
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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#58

Unread post by KA786110 » Mon Jun 01, 2015 2:40 pm

^
A Christian majority nation with a very humane constitution. The US constitution should be used as basis for all Muslim nations.
Could a non-muslim or non-sunni get any justice in the Salafi/Wahabi motherland Saudi Arabia?
Last edited by KA786110 on Mon Jun 01, 2015 3:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

KA786110
Posts: 360
Joined: Wed Apr 02, 2014 9:20 am

Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#59

Unread post by KA786110 » Mon Jun 01, 2015 2:46 pm

SBM wrote:Maulana Fazlur Rehman calls for military operation against jeans-wearing women
For a moment I thought, no he did not say that. But a quick Google search proved me wrong. And this nut job calls himself a scholar/ulema. Shameful. Has he ever done any real work? The reason Pakistan is going through such devastation is not because of educated women but because of these bigoted uneducated molvis. Military should hunt down him and his ilk instead.

Muslim First
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Re: Is Hijab Mandatory According To Quran And Ahadith ?

#60

Unread post by Muslim First » Mon Jun 01, 2015 5:37 pm

High court rules in favor of hijab-wearing job applicant who was turned down
The Supreme Court gave employees and job applicants stronger protection Monday from religious discrimination, ruling in favor of a 17-year-old Muslim girl who wore a black head scarf and was turned down for a sales job at an Abercrombie & Fitch store.

By an 8-1 vote, the high court said the store violated the federal Civil Rights Act because its managers knew or at least suspected she was wearing the scarf, or hijab, for religious reasons.

Read full report at:

http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-cou ... story.html