Note on Kiatab al-Zina by Abu Hatim al_Razi


This essay is prompted by Cornelius Berthold's article "The Leipzig Manuscript of Kiatab al-Zina by the Ismaili author Abu Hatim al-Razi. It is intended to develop, refine, and elaborate on that article and in particular to bring further evidence to bear on Berthold's argument on the structure of the book. Note on Kiatab al-Zina by Abu Hatim al_Razi (PDF).

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